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-VOL. I. No. 3.- 



THE 



AMERICAN 



" ANTI-SLAVERY 

ALMANAC, 



FOR 



1888, 



Being the second after Bissextile or Leap-Year, and the 62nd of American 
Independence. Adapted to most parts of the United States. 




" Thus saith the Lord, Execute judgment in the morning, and deliver him that is spoiled out 
of the hand of the oppressor." 



N. SOUTHARD, EDITOR. 

BOSTON; 
PUBLISHED BY ISAAC KNAPP. 
No. 25, Comhill. 



SB 






Anti- Slavery Almanac. 



[1838 



TIDES. 

In addition to the column giving the time of high water at Boston, 
occasional remarKs respecting the height of the tides, are made in 
the miscellaneous column. To consider the subject more particu- 
larly, the highest tides in each lunation, or interval between two 
successive changes of the moon, are those which happen a day 'and 
a half, or the third tide after the change and full. These are called 
Spring Tides. The lowest are those which happen about a day and a 
half after the moon's quadratures, and which are called Neap Tides. 
In the former case, the attractive forces of the sun and moon combine 
to produce the greatest effect on the waters of the ocean, and in the 
latter, the least, as these forces then operate in a manner against 
each other. These circumstances are again affected by the distances 
of the luminaries from the earth and their declinations ; the greatest 
spring tides following those sj^zygies which happen when the sun and 
moon are in the equinoctial, and at their least distances from the 
earth. The highest spring tides therefore, happen about the equi- 
noxes, and the lowest at mid-summer and mid-winter. It is import- 
ant to know when to expect these very high tides on account of their 
inundation of lands on the coast, and of their interference with some 
of the labors and operations of sea ports. 

In connection with this part of the subject, we have given two 
'tables, the first of which exhibits the mean rise or difference between 
high and low water at spring tide for several places on the coast ; 
the second contains factors for finding the rise of any spring tide 
during the year 1838. These factors were computed by M. Large- 
teau, (by the formula which Laplace has given in the, Mecanique 
Celeste, Vol. II. page 784, No. [2858], Dr. Bowditch's -transla- 
tion), and are directly copied from the Connaissance des Terns. Their 
use will be readily understood from the two following examples, it 
being only necessary to multiply the mean rise from table I. by the 
factor from table II. corresponding to the new or full moon at the 
time required. 



Required the rise of the new 
moon spring tide at Boston, 
March 25. ft. 

Mean rise from table I. 11. 
Factor from table II. 1.15 



Required the rise of the full 
moon spring tide at Portland, 
June 8. . ft. 

Mean rise, table I. 9. 

Factor, table II. 0.79 



Rise of spring tide req'rd 12.65 Rise of spring tide required 7.11 
It can hardly be necessary to add that no calculation can reach the 
effect of storms or long prevailing winds, which often cause a great 
difference in the rise of all tides. 

%The rise of the tides for all places throughout Massachusetts Bay 
is nearly the same. On the coast of Maine great difference prevails, 
the tides becoming very great toward New Brunswick ; still further 
toward the head of the Bay of Fundy, they are really formidable, the 
rise being in some places 70 feet. This, multiplied by the highest 
factor of our table gives more than 81 feet, and furthermore, storms 
have been known to increase the tides at one or two of these places, 
to the rise of 120 feet. 



1838] 



Anti- Slavery Almanac. 



Boston, i 

Cape Ann, 
EastporJ, 
Kennebec, 
Mount Desert, 
Machias, 

January 10 
" 25 

February 9 
« 24 

March 



April 
« 

May 
« 

June 



r. 11 
11 
25 
9 
12 
12 

Full 
New 
Full 
New 
Full 
New 
Full 
New 
Full 
New 
Full 
New 



TABLE I. 
Newburyport, ft. 
Portsmouth, 
Salem, 
Portland, 
Plymouth, 
Nantucket, 

TABLE II. 



Newport, 
Providence, 
New Haven, 
New York, 
Cape May, 



0.84 
0.76 
0.97 
0.82 
1.12 
0.86 
1.16 
0.85 
1.05 
0.79 
0.80 
0.77 
0.81 

The Calendar pages show the time of high water at Boston. For other places add 
or subtract the numbers in the following table. 

TABLE III. 
Albany, - add 4h 12m I Philadelphia, - add 2h 

Nantucket, - add 30 | Portland, - sub. 

New Bedford, - sub. 3 53 I Portsmouth, N. H. sub- 
New London, - sub. 2 36 | Providence, - sub. -3 
New York, - sub. 2 21 I St. Johns, N. B. add 
Newburyport, - sub. 15 | Vineyard Sound, sub 



0.74 
0.99 
0.80 
1.12 
0.86 
1.15 
0.87 
1.04 
0.82 
0.87 
0.79 
0.76 



July 
it 

August 
u 

September 

u 

October 

u 

November 

a 
December 



7 
21 

5 
19 

4 
18 

3 
18 

1 
17 

1 
16 
30 



Full 
New 
Full 
New 
Full 
New 
Full 
New 
FuU 
New 
Full 
New 
Full 



57m 

45 

15 

05 

30 

30 



TABLE IV. ASTRONOMICAL CHARACTERS. 



©0 Sun, 
8 Mercury, 
V Venus, 
d" Mars, 

HP Ariea, 
B Taurus, 
n Gemini, 
23 Cancer, 
A Leo, 
HR Virgo, 



§ Vesta, 

Q Juno, 

$ Pallas, 

5 Ceres, 

Ram, 

Bull, 

Twins, 

Crab, 

Lion, 

Virgin, 



% Jupiter, 5 First Quar. 
Tj Saturn, O F. Moon, 
}$. Uranus, d Last Quar. 
9 N. Moon, D Quartile, 
SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 



<$ Conjunction, 
8 Opposition 
Q Ascending Node, 
y Descending Node. 



Head, 

Neck, 

Arms, 

Breast, 

Heart, 

Belly, 



m 



Libra, Scales, 

Scorpio, Scorpion, 

f Sagitarius, Archer, 

£* C V> Capricomus, Goat, 

£ < ~ Aquarius, Waterman, 

> t X Pisces, Fishes, 



Reins, 

Secrets, 

Thighs, 

Knees, 

Legs, 

Feet. 



The Frontispiece. — The tree in the middle is slavery. An abolition- 
ist, with the axe immediatism, is laying heavy blows at the root. A 
gang of mobocratg from the rum-shop are making donations of eggs, 
stones, Sec. but they go against slavery. On the other side a D. D., the 
champion and representative of a corrupt church, stands first among 
those who, instead of holding back the arm of the abolitionist, try to 
hold up the tottering trunk of oppression. He is assisted by our 
northern civil and military office-holders, as well as by the whole mil- 
itary force of the nation, while the merchant, standing on his ledger, 
exerts his utmost strength, and the president of the U. S. volunteer! 
his veto power, for the same purpose. They had better ' stand from 
under 7 the falling tree, if they would not be crushed beneath it. 



4 



Anti-Slavery Almanac 



[183S 



ECLIPSES IN THE YEAR 1838. 
7. There will be four eclipses this year, two of the Sun and two of the 
Moon. 

1. An Eclipse of th Sun, March 25, visible to all parts of the 
United States. It will be visible to the wes, par of South America, 
and west and south of this, to the south part of the Pacific Ocean, it 
will be visible and total. 

2. A partial Eclipse of the Moon, April 9, visible throughout the 
United States as follows. 



D. H. M 

Beginning, 9 7 46 eve. } 
9 13 " J 
u 



Middle, 9 



Apparent time. 



Magnitude of the 
Eclipse 7 digits on the 
End, 9 10 39 * ) Northern Limb. 

3. An Eclipse of the Sun, Sept. 18, visible throughout the United 
States j at Boston as follows. 

D. H. M. 

Beginning, .... 18 4 6 eve. J - Magnitude of the 

Greatest obscuration, 18 4 52 " [ Ap. time. Eclipse, 11 digits on 

End, 18 6 5 " } the Southern limb. 

From New York to North Carolina this Eclipse will be Annular. 
At Washington, it will be Central. The North-eastern limit of the 
Annular phase is the South-west corner of Connecticut. 

4. An Eclipse of the Moon, Oct. 3, invisible to all parts of the U. S. 



EQUATION OF TIME. 

Many of our friends and patrons have manifested a partiali ty to keep- 
ing their reckoning by apparent time. Instead of yielding the point to 
the clock, they wish to consider the middle of the day as the true 
noon, which certainly seems the most natural way of the two, and is 
an many accounts more convenient. "We have therefore departed so 
much from our original course and the fashion of the day, as to con 
form our calculations to apparent, or solar time. If you wish to set a 
clock which should keep mean time, observe when the sun is on the 
meridian by a noon-mark or sun-dial ; — then if the sun is slow, add 
the equation, if fast, subtract it, from 12 o'clock, and it gives the 
true clock time. Thus you will find at apparent noon, June 1, the 
true time is llh. 57m. 26s. June 30, it is 12h. 3m. 12s. 

As for the weather, although we may be deemed behind the refine- 
ment of the times, we are still determined to have now and then a 
guess at it, hit or miss. Our prognostics are founded on the table 
which we published last year, and we hope that at least, they will be 
found as often right as wrong j at any rate, we shall endeavor not to 
confound winter snows with summer showers. 



" EXPLANATION OF THE CALENDAR PAGES. 
The 3d column shows the time of the sun's rising and setting ; the 
4th the days' length ; 5th the days' increase j 6th equation of time. 
[See above.] The 7th column shows the time when the moon is on 
the meridian ; the 8th the time of the moon's rising and setting ; the 
9th the time of high water ; 3ie 10th the moon's place. The mean- 
ing of the characters may be learned from table IV. on page 3. 



1838] Anti-Slavery Almanac. 



TO THE PUBLIC. 

In appearing the third time to spread before you the foul blood- 
guiltiness and imminent peril of this oppressive nation, I have reason 
to bless God for the candid hearing which has heretofore been ex- 
tended to me. Not less than seventy thousand copies of the two 
former numbers of this little annual have gone abroad to stir up the 
drowsy conscience of the nation. The time is now evidently near at 
hand, when the question is to be finally settled, whether we shall, as 
a people, turn from our sins and live, or cleave to our sins and be 
cashed in pieces. We need only to look at the slave code by the 
side of God's law, to be convinced that slavery is at irreconcilable 
war with every principle of God's moral government. Either 
His throne must be overturned that slavery may stand, or slavery 
must be annihilated that God's government may triumph over every 
high thing that exalteth itself against him. 

But what has the north to do with slavery ? asks the objector, with 
a confident air, which implies that we are not partners in this 
Heaven-defying iniquity; — while we are constantly thrusting men 
into slavery, who have fled to us for protection, while we are voting 
for the extension and perpetuation of slavery by admitting new 
states to the partnership >of guilt, while, instead of abolishing slavery 
at the capital, we have put a veto power into the hands of a man 
who had announced that he was the " inflexible opponent of any at- 
tempt to abolish slavery " there, without the consent of those who were, 
(in Jefferson's language,) "nursed, educated and daily exercised in 
tyranny." But, though I can begin to describe our guilty connection 
with slavery, I can never finish the task ; and 1 must forbear. 

It has been one great object of this publication 1o show that 
SLAVERY HAS MUCH TO DO WITH US. 

If the startling facts, of which I have here collected a scanty 
specimen, do not arouse the yeomanry of the north to a sense of the 
fact that our liberty has been doomed to become a sacrifice upon 
the smoking altar of slavery, then shall I expect to see the bloody 
rite speedily performed ; while that energy, which should have been 
employed in defending her against the priests of the Southern Mo- 
loch, will be spent in maniac raVings or fiend-like carnage. 

I have given a great variety of "pictures of slavery by slavehold- 
ers."" These, with only two or three exceptions, I cut with my own 
hands from the southern papers in which they first appeared. As 
my opportunity for examining such publications has 'been very lim- 
ited, it will at once be understood, that the reader here sees only a 
small part of those portraits which slaveholders have hung up in the 
vestibule of slavery ? s prison-house. Of the mad havoc which riots 
unchecked in her dark and secret caverns, we can have no concep- 
tion, which shall bear any near relationship to the reality, until the 
iron has entered our own souls. 

The reader will be glad to perceive that several of our ablest wri- 
ters have enriched this work with their contributions. 

The astronomical department of this number, has been under the j 
entire control of the experienced astronomer, who has acquired such 
well-earned celebrity as editor of "Parley's Almanac." There is 
therefore no fear of inaccuracies. N. SOUTHARD. 

A2 



9, 1837. J. Q. Adams presented several petitions for the abolition of 
slavery in the District of Columbia. There were 75 votes AGAINST 
their RECEPTION. 

10, 1837. Committee of Ohio Senate reported against a trial by jury 
for persons claimed as slaveg. 

12, 1837. Legislature of N. H. refused to incorporate the Freewill 
Baptist Home Miss. Soc, because some Freewill Baptists in the State 
believed the Declaration of Independence, 

28, 1832. Legislature of Md. instructed their senators to ask of Con- 
gress- an APPROPRIATION for the removal of FREE persons of 
color from the U. S., and to move an Alteration of the Con- 
stitution, if necessary, for that object. 

31, 1837. Pennsylvania State A. S. Society formed at Harrisburg. 



MOON'S PHASES. 
First Quarter, 
Full Moon, 



Day Hour Min, 
3 1 54m. 
10 & 28 a. 



Last Quarter, 
New Moon, 



Day Hour Min. 
18 7 40 a. 
25 8 54 a. 



D. W. 



£> 






D So. 
h. m. 



J) sets. 


H, wa. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


10 49« 


3 17a 


morn. 


4 4 


S 


5 1 


1 15 


8 12 


2 27 


7 32 


s as 


& 40 


4 49 


9 38 


5 54 


10 29= 


6 53 


11 12 


O rises 


11 49 


5 21« 


mom- 


6 25 


24 


7 29' 


53 


8 31 


1 22 


9 S2 


1 49 


1=0 32 


2 19 


11 33 


2 53> 


morn. 


3 32 


37 


4 24 


1 45 


5 32 


2 56 


6 50 


4 8- 


8 18 


5 18 


9 26 


6 22 


10 24 


3) sets 


11 13 


5 40a 


0« 


7 3 


42 


S 22 


1 23 


9 39 


2 1 


10 54 


2 40 




3 23 



3>'s 
place. 



Mond. 

Tuesd. 

Wedn. 

Thurs. 

Friday 

Satur. 

SUM 

Mond. 

Tuesd. 

Wedn. 

Thurs. 

Friday 
13'Saturd. 
U\SUM 
15 Mond. 
1-6 Tuesd. 
17'jWedn 
18jThurs. 
19 Friday 
2o!Saturd, 
%1\SUJY. 
22 Mond. 

28 j Tuesd. 
24 Wedn. 
2* Thurs. 
26Friday 
27jSatBrd 
23\SUJY. 

29 Mond. 
80 Tuesd. 
SI Wedn, 



SI 
31 
30 

30 
29 
29 
28 
28 
27 
26 
26 
25 
24 
23 
23 
22 
21 
20 
19 
13 
17 
16 
15 
14 
13 
12 
11 
10 
9 
8 
6 



9 
10 
12 
13,9 
140 

i6'o 

ISO 
20,0 
22 
24'0 
26 
28|0 
30 
32 
340 
360 
§8,0 
40 
420 
44 
47 



331 6 23 



4 50« 

5 37 



7 10 

7 59 

8 50 

9 42 

10 38 

11 32 
morn. 

24 
1 14 

1 58- 

2 40 



22 10 
24! 10 

2640 

2S'll 

son 

S211 
3111 

36|l2 

mm 

40|l2 
42. 12 
4413 
46.13 

4813 
50 13 

53 13 



18 




3 20 
8j S 59 
28 4 33 
47j 5 
6 6 
24 6 56 
41 1 7 86 
57i 8 33 
14 1 9 34 
27 10 38 
42 11 42 
5&! 43a 
7! 1 40 
18: 2 32 
30 3 22 
40 4 10 
49 4 58 



r 

8- 

8 

n 

n 

n 



SI 
SI 
SL 



t 
t 







TEARING UP FREE PAPERS. 

In the Southern States, every colored person is presumed to he a slave, till proved 

to be free; and they are often robbed of the proof. 



Po ■ i 



jf the Sun, Moon an 

.Tides, Weather, &r. 



{^} nearest the Earth Clear 
7*s south 8 45 a. and 
£ greatest elong. E. cold. 
21 stationary. 
Rather low tkles. 
Aldebaran S. 9 17 a. Fine 
% in Q.CapeUtiS.9 43 a 
Rigel S.9 47 a. and frosty. 
9 in £| Now. look 
S stationary. $ & lg. 
Belelgeux S. 10 14 a. for 
Rather high tides, snote. 
21 S. S 42 m. 
j) apogee. * rf <t - 
2f c> D Rather unsettled, 
with 



5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 

is 

14 
15 

16 Middling tides. 

17 7*s S. 7 40 a. rain 

18 Aldeb. S. 8 24 a. and 

19 $ in Inferior <$ @ occa 

20 Rather low tides. sional 

21 h 6 J> snow 

22 Capella S. 8 45 a. 

23 Warm, with rain, 

24 is <$ D er 

25 Ricrel S. 8 S4 a. 

26 ^ Perigee. $ g 3) snow. 

27 h ^ ^>. Pretty high tides. 
23 9 6 3) • 9 greatest "brill- 
29iBetelgeux S. 8 58 a. [iancy 
30 £ stationary. Jtfore 
31 1 9 sets 8 23 a. swoio. 



Readers! another rolling year has 
brought us together. Ii has also brought 
its 365 days of anguish to the slave, dc 
its 365 clays of guilt and infamy to the 
nation. But it has gone ; — gone with 
its 365 days which were kindly given 
as to labor for the deliverance of the 
slave, and the salvation of his oppress- 
ors. "We cannot recall the precious mo- 
ments we have wasted, nor can we 
ever atone fo-r our negligence : but we 
can show the sincerity of our repent- 
ance by redoubled zeal and industry 
the present year. 

In prosecuting our work, let us al- 
ways feel that it is a ' light thing to be 
judged of man's judgment.' Our whole 
couduct is naked and open before the 
eyes of Him who will soon judge us 
without RESPECT OF PERSONS. 



Would it not be well now to com- 
mence giving one cent a day to pro- 
mote the cause of universal liberty? 
Will you set your sympathy for the 
slave at a lower mark than this ? 



God has made out ' free papers ' for 
every human "being. "Our fathers, in 
signing the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, republished and endorsed them. 
Yet some American citizens are SOLD 
if they cannot produce additional free 
papers, and when they do, they are 
often robbed of those. 



8 



FEBRUARY begins on THURSDAY. 



[183S. 



6, 1837. J. Q. Adams presented to congress petitions against slavery, 
signed by 3641 persons. 

12, 1789. Dr. Benjamin Franklin's name was signed to a petition to 
the first congress which existed under that Constitution which he 
helped to form, praying them to exert the full extent of power vested 
in them by the Constitution, in discouraging the traffic in the human 
species. He was at that time president of the Pennsylvania Aboli- 
tion Society. " This," says Stuber, " was his last public act." 
Franklin died April 17, 1790. 

15, 1837. An act passed in New Jersey securing a trial by jury to per- 
sons in that State, in questions of personal freedom. A similar act, 
introduced by James C. Alvord, passed the legislature of Massa- 
chusetts a few weeks after. 

26, 1834. Legislature of Maryland, by a special act, offer a reward of 
$30 for seizing a runaway, and reducing him to slavery. 

27, 1837. Riot at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Mr. S. L. Gould, of Boston, 
was somewhat abused for speaking in behalf of liberty 



MOON'S PHASES. Day Hour Min. 


, Day Hour Min. 


J) First Quarter, 1 32 a. 


d Last Quarter, 17 


41 a. 


O Full Moon, 9 8 53 m. 


©New Moon, 24 7 


10 m 


S 


D. W. 


© |L.D. 


D.IN 


.© s!.|D So. 


J) sets. |H. wa 


. D's 


ri 


r. s.\h. m 


h. m 


m. s.\ h. m. 


h. m.\h. m 


. place. 


1 


Thurs. 


7 5 5j 9 50,0 56 13 57 


5 47a 


Bm 


4 11a 


8 


2 


Friday 


7 4 5 9 52 58 14 r 4 


6 39 


1 20 


5 21 


a 


3 


Saturd. 


7 S 5 9 54 1 014 11 


7 33 


2 34 


6 48 


n 


4 


SUM 


7 2 5 9 571 314 17 


8 26 


3 42 


8 11 


n 


5 


Mond. 


7 510 01 6 14 21 


9 20 


4 42 


9 19 


2Z 


6 


Tuesd. 


6 59 6'f0 2 1 814 25 


10 13 


5 28 


10 11 


S3 


7 


Wedo. 


6 58 610 41 1014 28 


11 S 


6 16 


10 53 


Z5 ' 


8 


Thurs. 


6 57 610 71 1344 31 


11 50 


6 50 


11 28 


SI 


9 


Friday 


6 55 610 10 I 16'l4 33 


morn. 


O rises 


11 57 


SI 


10 


Saturd. 


6 54 6'l0 121 18'l4 34 


32 


6 16a 


morn. 


Trg 


11 


SUM 


6 53 610 15 1 2l|l4 34 


1 13 


7 18 


24 


trjj 


12 


Mond. 


6 51 640 18 


1 24 14 33 


1 53 


8 17 


50 


Trt? 


13 


Tuesd. 


6 50 610 20 


1 2614 32 


2 30 


9 18 


1 15 


-n. 


14 


Wedn, 


6 49 6,10 23 


1 29 14 30 


3 10 


10 22 


1 45 


£Zb 


15 


Thurs. 


6 47 6 


10 26 


1 32 


14 27 


3 52 


11 28 


2 25 


n 


16 


Friday 


6 46 6 


10 2S 


1 34 


14 23 


4 36 


morn. 


2 56 


n 


17 


Saturd. 


6 45 6 


10 31 


1 37 


14 19 


5 24 


36 


3 44 


1T1 


18 


SUM 


6 43 6 


10 34 


1 40 


14 13 


6 16 


1 46 


4 48 


f 


19 


Mond. 


6 42 6 


10 36 


1 42 


14 8 


7 14 


2 57 


6 17 


t 


20 


Tuesd. 


6 41 6 


10 39 


1 45 


14 1 


8 15 


4 2 


7 54 


V? 


21 


Wedn. 


6 39 6 


10 42 


1 48 


13 55 


9 18 


4 53 


9 10 


v? 


22 


Thurs. 


6 38 6 


10 44 


1 50 


13 47 


10 20 


5 44 


10 4 


/*W 


23 


Friday 


6 37 6 


10 46 


1 52 


13 39 


11 20 


6 21 


10 54 


/VW 


24 


Saturd 


6 36 6 


10 49 


I 55 


13 30 


16a 


% sets. 


11 39 


5c 


25 


SUN. 


6 34 6 


10 52 


1 58 


13 21 


1 S 


7 12 


19« 


X 


26 


Mond. 


6 S3 6 


.10 55 


2 1 


13 11 


1 59 


8 31 


57 


Of 


27 


Tuesd. 6 31 6 


10 58 2 4 


13 o; 2 41 


9 49 


1 36 


T 


2S 


Wedn. '6 29 G 


11 2 2 S 


12 49 3 41 


11 7 


2 16 


&_ 



1S3S.] FEBRUARY— SECOND MONTH. [28 days. 




YOUNG HOUSE-RACERS TORTURING A FREE CITIZEN FOR AMUSEMENT ! 

The colored man was seized, fastened to the horse's tail, and driven several 
miles. His free papers were at home, and be could not instantly produce them. 
He was found dead by the road side the next morning. 

[See Torrey's Portraiture (Philadelphia, 1817), p. 34/| "On the side of their 
oppressors there was power, but they had no comforter." (Eccl. 4 : 1.) 



Positions of the Sun, Moon and 
Stars Tides, Weather, &c 



Canopus S. 9 19 a. Warm, 
Low tides. with 
Sirius 3. 9 29 a. rain. 

21 S. 2 6 m. Changeable, 
Middling tides, with Utile 
Castor S. 10 3 a. fine 
weather for some time. 
Procyon S. 10 2 a. 
9 stationary. Unsettled, 
Middling tides. cold, 
J) apogee. 21 6 3> • with 
$ greatest elongation W. 
9 sets 7 48 a. snoxo 
Pollux S. 9 43 a. or 
y in £3. rain. 

Sirius S. 8 S7 a. 

hQ®- \6 J). Be- 
Rather low tides. comes 
Castor S. 9 1 2 a. more 
9 sets 7 14 a. mild, but 
21 S. 52 m. continues 
g <$ J). unsettled. 

Now ex- 

J> peri. 6* <$©. 6* cS <C. 
High fides. pect a few 

Procyon S. 8 52 a. days 
9 6® of fine 

g £ y . pleasant weather. 



ABOLITION,— A RELIGIOUS EN- 
TERPRISE. 

BY A KENTTJCKIAN. 

The proper ground to place abolition 
upon is a religious ground. We can- 
not be too careful to prevent its assum- 
ing a political type, or degenerating 
into a secular character. We cannot 
do or say too much to impress our fellow 
Christians (who, after all, are the hope 
of the slave) that abolition is not a hu- 
man enterprise, with human ends 
and human instrumentalities, — a mere 
crusade for human rights; but that 
it is a spiritual conflict, with spirit- 
ual weapons and for spiritual ends, — 
a holy warfare for the cause of Jesus 
Christ. 

We should mainly urge this consid- 
eration, — that slavery is a sin^against 
God. A conviction of this we should 
strive to produce in every heart. For 
myself, I can freely say that I have no 
confidence in any other abolitionism 
than that which is based upon this prin- 
ciple. I would not have the list of ab-- 
olitionists swelled by a single name 
however influential, which did not 
pledge a heart responsive to this truth: 
Let us seek to make thorough abolition- 




MARCH bes-ins on THURSDAY. 




2, 1807. Act of Congress prohibiting the foreign slave trade was passed, 
to take effect Jan. 1, 1808. 

4, 1837. Martin Van Buren became president of the United States. 
When taking the oath of office, he pledged himself to veto a consti- 
tutional act, if it was' against the wishes ofthe slave-holding states.' 

6, 1837. A Petition of fathers !md mothers of New York, praying 
for a trial by jury when the LIBERTY of themselves and children 
is at stake, was REJECTED by the N.Y. House of Assembly. Also 
• a Petition praying that the Constitution of the State might be so amend- 
ed that a man's complexion should not disqualify him from voting. 

12, 1832. Law passed in the Legislature of Maryland prohibiting 
emancipation without expulsion from the State, unless the slaves 
procure certificates of extraordinary good conduct or character. 



MOON'S PHASES. 
]) First Quarter, 
O Full Moon, 


Day Hour Min. 
3 1 38 m. 
11 3 45 m. 


Day Hour Min. 
d Last Quarter, 19 . 1 39 m. 
® New Moon, 25 4 54 a. 




D. W. 


r. s. 


L. D. 

h. m. 


D.IN. 

h. m. 


©si. 
m. s. 


J> So. 
h. m. 


D sets. 
h. m 


H. wa. 
h. m. 


D's 
place. 



Thurs. 

Friday 

Saturd. 

SUM 

Mond. 

Tuesil. 

Wedu. 

Thurs. 

Friday 



Saturd. 

SUN. 

Mond. 

Tuesd. 

Wedn. 

Thurs. 

Friday 

Saturd. 

SUjV. 

Mond. 

Tuesd. 

Wedn. 
22 Thurs. 
23jFriday 
24; Saturd. 
tt\SUN. 

26 Mond. 

27 Tuesd. 



Wedn 
Thurs. 
Friday 



31|Saturd 



611 



42 

7^2 
92 

12*2 
162 

182 

21;2 

24 2 

27,2 

80 2 

33|2 

35 ! 2 

38'2 

40 2 

43 2 

462 

49^2 

522 

553 

58 3 

13 

43 

73 

103 

133 

12 163 

12 193 

12 22 3 

12 253 

12 23'3 

12 3l|3 



611 
61 1 

6.11 

611 

611 

6'll 

6;ll 

611 

611 

6|ll 

611 

611 

611 

611 

611 

611 

611 

611 

611 

6|12 

7 12 

712 

7|12 

7112 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 



1012 
13:12 



12 



11 



24! 11 
27J11 
3011 



4 84a 

5 28 

6 21 

7 17 

8 12 

9 8 
9 51 



1 10 35 
46jll 17 
30,11 55 
14 morn. 



38 
1 15 

1 56 

2 39 

3 25 

4 16 

5 10 

6 11 

7 10 

8 10 

9 9 
10 5 

10 59 

11 48 
42a 



30a 1 33 



2 27 

3 23 

4 20 

5 17 



morn 


3 0a 


22 


3 51 


1 34 


4 56 


2 37 


6 22 


3 83 


7 50 


4 19 


8 55 


4 59 


9 51 


5 25 


10 81 


5 48 


11 5 


6 8 


11 31 


O rises 


morn. 


7 17a 


2 


8 20 


27 


9 24 


52 


10 31 


1 26 


11 42 


1 59 


morn. 


2 41 


49 


3 82 


1 58 


4 43 


2 54 


6 12 


3 43 


7 45 


4 22 


8 58 


4 55 


9 52 


5 22 


10 38 


^ sets. 


11 17 


7 28a 


0a 


8 47 


38 


10 6 


1 19 


11 23 


2 


morn. 


2 45 


34 


3 39 



8 
n 
n 



SI 
SI 

n 
n 

t 
t 

v? 



T 

r 
8 



n 
n 



'": 'S^::Y-: -^y-jy:— ,>r:?*r^i 2-T*_- ~— s 



1838.] 



MARCH— THIRD MONTH. [31 days 




Instead of being allowed to comfort and assist one another, the slaves are often 
compelled to bold one of their number, while another wretched being is forced to 
ply the lash. 



Positions of the Sun, Moon and 
Stars Tides, Weather, &c. 



21 S. 17 m. Fine for 
Castor S. 8 31 a. March 
9 ^ $ . but unless 
21 2 ©• Low southerly 
9 in inferior £ @. tides. 
Pollux S. 8 7 a. winds 
9 ^ $ . prevail, the 

\ stationary, weather 
Regulus S. 10 40 a. will 
21 6 D - be generally cold. 
Sudden storms of 
£ ^ 9 . snow, varied 

£ £ t$ . Very high tides. 
j) perigee. with 

21 S. 11 15 a. rain. 

>2 £ J) . "High winds. 
\ S. 4 1 in. 

Becomes clear again, 
Cor Hydrse S. 9 23 a 
(v) enters ^. Spring begins 
Low tides. But cool. 

Regulus S. 9 52 a. 
?rj}>.N <?..?sta'y 

Becomes mild, 
$ 6 3> • (£> eclipsed, inv 
Middling iw7A 

tides. symptoms 
J> apogee. o/ 

$ in superior £ ©. 
2/ S. 10 15 a. sfwwei 
Regulus S. 9 20 a. 



ists ; — not political abolitionists, nor 
commercial abolitionists, but pious ab- 
olitionists, — men who, while they give 
their sympathies to the slaves, will also 
give their hearts to God. Let the anti- 
slavery motto be, not ' I am a man, and 
therefore an abolitionist,' but rather this, 
' I love God, and therefore I am an ab- 
olitionist.' 

The peculiar enormity of slavery con- 
sists in its being a sin against God. 
This towering feature overshadows all 
the violations of human rights and all 
the blighting of human hopes, of which 
slavery is incessantly guilty. This, its 
sin against God, consists not merely in 
its trampling upon the rights of man, 
but still more in the disregard which it 
thereby shows for the express will of 
God. Slavery violates the explicit pre- 
cepts of the Bible, and the attempt to 
sanction it from the Bible is most awful 
sacrilege. Slavery stabs to the heart 
the law of love, it outrages the spirit of 
the gospel, it opposes the temper of 
Christ, it makes the atonement a mock- 
ery, the cross a mimic tragedy, the 
judgment a farce, hell a trifle, heaven 
a shadow, eternity a void, — and, in one 
word, writes LIE upon all the realities 
of the universe. This is the sin of 
slavery! If it does not go one step 
further, and make God a nullity, it is 
onlv because, like its father the devil, 



12 APRIL begins on SUNDAY. 


[1838. j 


The bells are securely fastened upon some slaves, who are 


thought 


to be disposed to run away. The slave in the picture, named Paul, 


was a native of Africa. He was stolen away from his widowed mother, 


his wife, and four children. His master was often drunk, and ex 


remely 


cruel to all his slaves, but especially so to Paul, whose life was 


made 


insupportable. Notwithstanding his bells, he ran away, and concealed 


himself three or four weeks, living on land tortoises, frogs, and other 


reptiles. His back was hard, and all seamed and ridged with scars 


made by the whip and hickory stick, so that scarcely any of the 


original 


color remained. At length he hung himself. When found, 


le was 


hanging by a cord made of hickory bark. The air was filled with birds 


of prey, but when they tried to tear the flesh, the bells scared them away. 


He preferred all this to slavery. There is not one slave at the sou 


th who 


has any security against similar cruelty. 




MOON'S PHASES. -Day Hour Min. 


Day Hour Min. 


D First Quarter, 1 4 44 a. 


(T Last Quarter, 17 10 


40 m, 


O Full Moon, 9 9 21 m. 


$ New Moon, 24 2 


18 ra. 


S 


D. W. 


© 


L. D. 


D.IN. 


©si. 


J> So. 


3) sets. 


H. wa. 


^'s 


P 




r. s. 


k. m. 


h. m. 


m. s. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


place. 


IISUjV. 
2Mond. 


5 43 7 


12 34{3 40 


3 57 


6 13a 


1 35m 


4 40a 


£5 


5 42 7 


12 36.3 42 


3 39 


7 6 


2 25 


6 3 


£5 


3 Tuesd. 


5 41 7 


12 38 3 44 


3 22 


J7 55 


3 4 


7 23 


a 


4 


Wedn. 


5 39 7 12 41J3 47 


3 4 


8 41 


3 35 


8 33 


sv 


5 


Thurs. 


5 S3 7,12 44,3 50 


2 46 


9 23 


4 


9 27 


si 


6 


Friday 


5 36 7,12 47 3 53 


2 28 


10 4 


4 22 


10 7 


«k 


7 


Saturd. 


5 35 7J12 503 56 


2 11 


10 44 


4 41 


10 40 


*% 


8 


SUJY. 


5 34 7 12 523 53 


1 54 


11 24 


5 2 


11 10 


-ru 


9 


Mond. 


5 32 7 12 554 1 


1 37 


morn. 


O rises 


11 37 


:Ct 


10 


Tuesd. 


5 31 7 12 584 4 


1 20 


4 


7 24 


morn. 


--T\. 


11 


Wedn. 


5 29 713 14 7 


1 3 


4^ 


8 29 


5 


"1 


12 


Thurs. 


5 28 7 13 3 4 9 


47 


1 28 


9 41 


34 


1T l 


13 


Friday 


5 27 7!l3 6!4 12 


31 


2 21 


10 50 


1 11 


t 


14 


Saturd. 


5 25 713 9J4 15 


15 


3 14 


11 57 


1 52 


t 


15 


SUJY. 


5 24 7;13 124 18 


©Pst 


4 11 


morn. 


2 38 


>? 


16 


Mond. 


5 22 7)13 15 4 21 


14 


5 10 


56 


3 33 


>? 


17 


Tuesd. 


5 21 7(13 184 24 


29 


6- 9 


1 47 


4 42 


V? 


18 


Wedn. 


5 20 7(13 20 ! 4 26 


43 


7 7 


2 27 


6 6 


AW 


19 


Thurs. 


5 18 7jl3 23 ! 4 29 


1 57 


8 2 


3 1 


7 36 


MV 


20 


Friday 


5 17 7{13 25 ! 4 31 


1 10 


8 55 


3 30 


8 41 


K 


21 


Saturd. 


5 16 7 13 2S|4 34 


1 22 


9 45 


3 53 


9 33 


K 


22 


SUjY. 


5 15 7:1 3 304 36 


1 34 


10 35 


4 19 


10 17 


°f 


23 Mond. 


5 13 7.13 33'4 39 


1 46 


11 26 


4 42 


10 59 


T 1 


24 Tuesd. 


5 12 7,13 354 41 


1 58 


16a 


©sets. 


11 45 


8 ; 


25 Wedn. 


5 11 7;1S 384 44 


2 9 


1 15 


9 5a 


24a 


8 


26|Thurs. 


5 9 713 41 4 47 


2 19 


2 12 


10 20 


1 7 


n 


27| Friday 


5 8 7 13 44.4 50 


2 39 


3 10 


11 27 


1 50 


n 


28 Saturd 


5 7 713 464 52 


2 39 


4 8 


mom. 


2 36 


£3 1 


&\SUN. 


5 6 7 13 484 54 


2 48 


5 3 


23 


3 24 


£5 J I 


so! 


Mond. 


5 4 7.13 51 4 57 


2 56 


5 55 1 


1 6 


4 19 


£5 II 



wvtorf.fvfatefnrr^^^ 



1838.] 



APRIL— FOURTH MONTH. [30 days. 




The slave Paul had suffered so much in slavery, that he chose to encounter ilic 
hardships and perils of a runaway. He exposed himself, in gloomy forests, to cok 
and starvation, and finally hung himself, that he might not again fall into tht 
hands of his tormentor. [See Ball's Narrative, 2d Edit. p. 325.] 



Positions of the Sun, Moon an 
Stars. . . .Tides, Weather, &c. 



Alphard S. 8 37 a. 
Low tides. Rainy, 

Regulus S. 9 9 a. with 
Alkes S. 9 58 a. perhaps 
$ Q>. a snow squall 

3> apogee. 21 6 D • or 
Mirach on mer. 9 47 a. 
Dubhe on mer. 9 45 a. 
J) eclipsed, visible, two. 
9 at greatest brilliancy. 
g ^ £ . Pretty high tides 
9 rises 3 32 m. Some snow 
h6D. 9 6^> f rom 

2£ S. 9 16 a. eastward, 
\ S. 2 1 1 m. Rather un- 
Mirach on mer. 9 14 a. 
Dubhe on mer. 9 11 a. 
Low tides. settled. 

Alkes S. 9 2 a. Jin occa 

¥ 6 D- 9 6 3>- **°» a 
Denebola S. 9 54 a.shower 
j) perigee. Now expect 
$ & J) . several days of 
High tides, fine pleasant 
£ greatest elon.E. $ £ J) 
Zavijava S. 9 26 a. April 
Algorab S. 10 6 a. 
21 sets 3 1m. weather. 
\l S. 1 17 a. Rather 
9 <Q. . cool. 



it would rather war against His attri- 
butes, than deny His being. 

How then should Christians regard 
this daring libeller of the God they 
love ? There can be but one answer 
to this question, — they must abhor it. 
Yes; let this truth be written upon the 
four walls of every church in these 
United States, — Christians must 
abhor Slavery, op. renounce 
God. 

Reader, you may now excuse your- 
self from rxiing, because the slaves are 
black. Will that excuse avail you 
when your Judge shall own them as 
His brethren ? — when he shall say, 
' Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of 
the least of these, ye did it not to me.' 
Will it not be insulting your Creator to 
his face to urge such a plea ? If so, how 
dare you use it now? 



Francis Durret, in the Huntsville 
(Ala.) Democrat of March 8, 1837, 
advertises a mulatto slave who had 
escaped from him, who " had on when 
he left, a pair of hand-cuffs, a pair 
of drawing chains," &c. 



What would you do to redeem your- 
lf from slavery ? * Then shalt love thy 
neighbor A S thyself J 



14 



MAY begins on TUESDAY. 



[1838. 



26, 183^. The U. S. House of Representatives adopted the following: 
" Resolved, That all Petitions, Memorials, Resolutions and propo- 
sitions relating in any way, or to any extent whatever, to the subject of 
Slavery, shall, without being either printed or referred, be laid on the 
table, and that no further action whatever shall be had thereon." 
Yeas, 117. Nays, 68. It was a second time adopted, Jan. 18, 1837. 

If we would not forever lose the right of petition, we must use it. 
This year, we ought, every one of us, to petition Congress to abolish 
slavery in Dis. Col. and the Territories, — so to " regulate commerce 
among the several states," as to abolish the internal slave trade, — and 
to reject any proposition for ihe admission of Texas ; and we should 
also petition our state governments to join their prayers with ours. 



MOON'S PHASES. Day Hour Min. 

J) First Quarter, 1 9 24 m 

O Full Moon, 9 17 a. 

d Last Quarter, 16 5 2 a. 



@ New Moon, 
D First Quarter, 



Day Hour Min. 
23 11 42 m. 
31 2 54 m. 



D. W. 



© |L.D. 

s,\h. m. 



D.m, 

h. m. 



fa. 



J) So. 
h. m. 



D sets. 
h. m. 



H. wa. 

h. m. 



place. 



1 (Tuesd. 

2Wedn. 

8 Thurs. 

4 Friday 

5. Saturd. 

6 SUM. 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



Mond. 
Tuesd. 
Wedn. 
Thurs. 

Friday 
Saturd. 
SUM. 
Mond. 
Tuesd. 
Wedn. 
17 Thurs. 



Friday 

Saturd. 

SUM. 

Mond. 

Tuesd. 

Wedn. 

Thurs. 

Friday 

Saturd 

SUM. 

Mond. 

Tuesd. 

Wedn.|4 

Thurs. 4 



713 
713 
7;i3 
8 14 

844 
814 
844 
55 8 14 
54 814 
53 814 

52 8'l4 
51 8 14 
50 8 14 

43 814 
47 8'l4 
46 8 14 
45 8 14 

44 8'l4 
43 814 
42 814 
42 814 
41 8-14 
40 
39 

53 8;i4 



5- 2 



814. 
814 



37 8 ! ,14 

36 8|l4 

36 8 14 

35 8|14 

34 8114 

S3 8 ! 14 



54 5 
565 

585 
2 ! 5 
45 
65 
85 
105 
125 
145 
16 5 
13|5 
21,5 
23 5 
25'5 
275 
29'5 
325 
34' 5 
365 
37'5 
385 
40,5 
425 
44*5 
465 
48'5 
495 
505 
525 
546 





2 

4 

8 
10 
12 
14 
16 
IS 
20 
22 
24 
27 
29 
31 
33 
35 
3S 
40 
42 
43 
44 
46 
48 
50 
52 
54 
55 
56 
58 

01 2 



6s 43a 

7 26 

8 8 

8 47 

9 26 
10 6 

10 43 

11 S2 
morn. 

20 



8 SO 

9 13 



10 8 

11 1 
11 57 

54a 



54 
52 
46 
35 
21 
3 



6 43 



1 42m 

2 11 

2 33 
2 



53 
3 11 

3 23 

3 47 

4 8 
O rises 

8 44a 

9 53 

10 56 

11 48 
morn. 

32 
7 



35 

1 

27 

55 

3 9 

S 36 

]) sets 

9 8a 

10 11 

11 1 
11 41 
morn. 

10 
35 
56 



5 23a 


6 37 


7 40 


8 47 


9 30 


10 6 


10 40 


11 14 


11 47 


morn. 


23 


1 4 


1 48 


2 36 


3 32 


4 S3 


5 43 


7 2 


8 9 


9 4 


9 54 


10 41 


11 26 


9a 


52 


1 35 


2 14 


2 54 


3 38 


4 23 


5 23 



Trt> 
-r\. 
-n 
TTl 

n 
t 

t 
t 

>? 
v? 



°f 
°r 
8 
8 
n 
n 
n 



SI 
SI 




• The purchaser of the husband has sent to have him dragged away. As he does 
not wish for the ' balance' of the family, Ihey have been taken by different pur- 
chasers. See page 33. 



Positions of the Sun, Moon and 
Stars Tides, Weather, &c. 



A. A. S. SOCIETY. 

At their annual meeting, May 9, '37, 
the following officers were chosen. 

Arthur Tappan, President ; William 
Jay, E. Wright, Jr. Cor. Sees.- A. A. 
Phelps, Bee. See.; John Rankin, Treas. 
Arthur Tappan, Lewis Tappan, John 
Rankin, S. S. Jocelyn, S. E. Cornish, 
La Roy Sunderland, Charles Follen, 



11 S. 8 9 a. Unsettled, 

Rather low tides. with 

% 6 D- grj©. occa- 

J) apogee, sional showers. 

\ S. 53 m. Changeable, 

21 station'v. $ station'y. 

Denebola S. 8 48 a. with 

Algorab S. 9 24 a. now and Theodore S. Wright, Duncan Dunbar, 
Joshua Leavitt, E. Wright, Jr., A. A. 
Phelps, Executive Committee. 

If we had the whole nation abolition- 
ized to choose from, we could not com- 
mit the interests of our cause to better 
hands. The true friends of the op- 
pressed will not hesitate to sustain 
them in all their undertakings. The 
society has more than 1000 auxiliaries. 



Alioth on meridian 9 41 a. 
"fy £ J) . Rather high tides 
21 S. 7 31 a. then a pleasant 
\l S. 12 m. day or two. 
<? greatest elon.W. £ £3. 
Algorab S. 8 57 a. Signs 
Cor Caroli S. 9 19 a. of 
J2 £ ©. Low tides, rain. 
% in inferior <$ ©. # ^ J> 
Spica S. 9 36 a. Now expect 
19| j) perigee, a succession of 

20 <j> 6 3)- warm, pleasant 

21 ArcturusS. 10 15 a. day 

22 $ 6 D • ^gelation rapid. 
2$ $ A J) . Becomes cool. 
24, High tides. Showers. 

25 S 6 $ • Continues cool, 
26'Cor Caroli S. 8 35 a. with 
27 j Spica S. 9 a. considerable 
28 Arcturus S. 9 47 a. disposi 
29, £ stationary. Hon to rain. 
SO, Rather low tides. Change- 
Sll J) apogee. 21 6 D- a ^ e ' 



Though we may forget that a cry 
from the blood and groans and tears of 
our brothers, whose chains have been 
fastened by norihern hands, is going 
up to heaven from the prisons, the 
'•'sugar houses," the cane-fields, the 
rice-sw T amps, the secret huts and the 
secluded plantations of the south, yet 
Jehovah can never forget the word 
which he spake of old to the oppressors 
of the poor ; — " If they cry at all unto 

me, I WTLL SURELY HEAR THEIR CRT, 
AND MY WRATH SHALL WAX HOT AGAINST 
Y0~ JT™ T WT ™> THLL YOU" WTTH THE 



16 JUNE begins on FRIDAY. [1838. j 


SEPARATING PARENTS FROM CHILDREN. 


Children, see those two little boys ! see that child under the man's 


arm ! See that poor woman with chains on her wrists, stretching out her 


hand toward the little babe ! She is their MOTHER. The boys are 


crying. They hsywe seen their dear mother for the last time. See how 
she tries to reach them. She would go after them, but her hands and 


feet are chained, and that wicked man holds her back. How he looks ! 


Do they take the children away because she was unkind to them, or 


could not take care of them ? No ; but the man who is driving the boys 


with a hickory stick is a slaveholder. So he came and paid money to 


the man who is quietly smoking a cigar, and bought them. The hearts 


of the mother and children are broken, but the slaveholders pity them 


not. Do you ask if this is true ? Yes ; children are torn from their 


parents, and parents from their children, every day, at the south. 


MOON'S PHASES. Day Hour Min. 


Day Hour Min. 


O Full Moon, 8 8m. 


# New Moon, 21 9 48 a. 


d Last Quarter, 14 9 47 a. J> First Quarter, 29 8 25 a. 


S 




© 


L. D. 


D.IN. 


©fa. 


D So. 


Dsets 


H. wa 


. }> '3 


P 


D. W. 


»:. s. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


m. s. 


h. m. 


h. m 


. hi m 


. place. 


Friday 


4 33 8114 5416 


2 34 


7 22a 


1 15m 


6 32a 


m 


.2 


Satur. 


4 33 8.14 55 6 1 


2 25 


8 1 


1 33 


7 38 


./i 


3 


SUM. 


4 32 8 14 56|6 2 


2 15 


3 42 


1 51 


8 38 


£Y. 


4 


Mond. 


4 32 8114 57 6 3 2 5 


9 24 


2 10 


9 25 


n 


5 


Tuesd. 


4 31 8 14 58 6 4 


1 56 


10 11 


2 31 


10 6 


m 


1 6 


Wedn. 


4 31 8 14 59 6 5 


1 45 


11 2 


2 58 


10 47 


n 


1 7 


Thurs. 


4 30 815 06 6 


1 34 


11 53 


3 32 


11 29 


t 


h 


Friday 


4 30 845 16 7 


*1 23 


morn. 


O rises 


morn. 


t 


! 3 


Saturd. 


4 29*815 2 6 8 1 12 


57 


9 41a 


12 


>? 


i l0 


SUM. 


4 29 8 15 3 6 9 1 


1 53 


10 28 


55 


V? 


in 


.^fond. 


4 28* 8 15 8 6 10 48 


2 57 


11 4 


1 37 


/VtV 


i 12 


Tuesd. 


4 28 8 15 46 10 36 


3 53 


11 38 


2 27 


**v 


13 


Wedn. 


4 28 8 15 46 10 24 


4 48 


morn. 


3 16 


5? 


14 


Thurs. 


4 27 815 5J6 111 12 


5 36 





4 6 


x 


15 


Friday 


4 27 8 15 66 12©slo 


6 23 


23 


5 5 


°i° 


16 


Saturd. 


4 27 815 66 12 


13 


7 10 


45 


6 12 


T 


3 7 


SUM. 


4 27 Sl5 66 12 


25 


7 58 


1 7 


7 26 


8 


18 


Mond. 


4 27 Silo 66 12 


39 


8 50 


1 34 


S 36 


8 
8 
n 


! 19 


Tuesd. 


4 27 815 66 12 


52 


9 42 


2 3 


9 32 


j 20 


Wedn. 


4 27 8.15 66 12 1 1 6J10 33 


2 39 


10 25 


21 


Thurs. 


4 27 815 6 ! Ddecj 1 1941 36 


J) sets. 


11 11 


n 


22 


Friday 


4 27 845 60 1 32 


S4a 


8 47 


11 56 


£5 


23 


Saturd. 


4 27 8|l5 60 1 45 


1 29 


9 29 


35a 


£5 


24 


SUM 


4 27 815 6 0, 1 58 


2 25 


10 8 


1 12 




25 


Mond. 


4 27 815 60 2 11 


3 10 


10 32 


1 45 


o 


28 


Tuesd. 1 


4 27 8'15 60 0, 2 23 3 52 


10 53' 


2 17 


O 


27 


Wedn. 


4 27 815 6,0 0: 2 35! 


4 33 


11 12 


2 48 


TK 


28 


Thurs. 


4 27 815 6 2 49| 


5 12 1 


11 29 


3 22 


Vft 


29 


Friday 


4 27 815 60 3 11 


5 $1 


11 48 


4 7 


£\- 


;30 


Saturd. j 

■a— — n 


4 27 815 50 l 1 3 12: 6 3(5 1 


morn. 


5 4 


■p. 




Ev'n her babes, so dear, so young, 
And so treasured in her heart, 

Th:it the cords which round them clun° 
Seemed its life, its dearest part; 



The«e, ev'n these, were tom n\av ! 

These, that, when all else were gonej 
Cheered the heart with one bright ray, 

That .-till bade its pulse beat on! 



IPositi 
Stfn 



of the Hun, Moon and 

..Tides, Weatber, &c 



1 Spica S. 8 40 a. 

9. A returns S. 9. 26 a. 
JfT □'©. 'Fair and 

Mi iac"S. 9 48 a. jine, 
21 sets, l 21 m. with now 
\ £ J) . and then a 

7|>2 S. 10 27 a. shower. 
Spiea S. 8 11 a. 
Middling tides. Windy, 
Arcturus S. 8 54 a. 



■ In Kentucky there lived* a wicked 
woman, a slaveholder, and a member 
of the Presbyterian church. Oi 
slaves was the mother of two children, 
7 and 9 years old. The woman sold 
the mother to another slaveholder, and 
did not let her know it. When she was 
seized 



II Alphacca S. 10 9 a. 
|.2 v ; greatest elong.W. 

13 Mirac S. 9 11 a. Change- 

14 j) perigee, %i £ J) . able 

1 5 b S. 9 52 a. 
16' A returns S. 
17i ig. stationary, ran. 
18! 9 <$ J). 21 sets 11 40a. 
1 $' 6 6 D- Continues 

20 | $ 6 D • ^settled, with 

21 |(v) enttersfS- Sum'r begins, 

22 Middling tidfeg. rain orca- 
&S' Aiphacca S. 9 20 a. sion- 
24 $ Q. 21 sets 11 17 a. aliy 



} she shrieked and cried, and the 
children cried when they saw their 
mother torn from them, but the slave- 
holder did not regard their crie ;. lie 
chained their mother, and drove her 
away, where she never saw her chil- 
dren again. 

Can slaves be happy, when they are 
all the time exposed to such eru< 1 sep- 
arations! There are 600,000 cl 
with comidyu the U. S. every moment liable to be 
28 a. erableilovti from their mothers. Children, do 



ssa >i 5. 9 7 a. and with hid 

26 Antares S. 9 58 a. a fewL 

27 21 6 D - fi ne d a V s to l ^ € 

28 j) apogee, end of the 

29 Aiphacca S. 8 55 a. monM.jbody believes this 
I SO'-) farthest frotn t he earth, slaves in the world 



you think slavery ia right ? V 
thieves and robbers do ? Who is ?. rob- 
ber, if the man who takes children 
from their mothers and sells them is 
not a robber ? 

Children 1 , pray for the wicked slave- 
holder, and for the heartbroken slave, 
Can you do anything to free the poor 
slave children, so they may not be lorn 
rom their mothers and sold ? Yes ; you 
an fry to convince all your neighbors 
nid playmates that it is wicked to rob 
he innocent of liberty. When every 
there will be no 



23, 1S36. W. L. Garrison elected honorary 

If we do not arouse ourselves soon, this " last refuge of liberty" will 
be left the only earthly home of slavery. 

Flow e;m religious freedom exist, where some preachers are held as 
property, while other preachers hold men as property? ' 

<•' $'50 REWARD, for ARTHUR. He may be known by being in the! 
habit of preaching among slaves." — J\ r . O. Bee, Sept. 3, 1836. He' 
may be known by his " always abounding in the work of the Lord." 

" Brought to Jail, PRIMUS, who says he belongs to the REV.* 
Mr. Harrison, of Columbia county, and ran away from bis plantation, in 
Rurke county." — Savannah paper, Aug. 22; 1836. Mr. H. .proclaims! 
the gospel Christ preached to the poor in one county, and enslaves the! 
poor, for whom Christ died, in another. 

BOON'S PHASES. Day Hour Mill. | Day Hour iUin. j 

O Full Moon, 7 9 30 m. @ New Moon, 21 9 32 m. 

d Lust Quarter, 14 2 30 m. J) First Quarter, 29 1 4a. 



© sl.p So. DsetsJH. wa. 
m. sJ h. m. h. m.\k. m. 







l. d. \D.de. 
k. m.\h..m. 



place. 



i<SUM 

2' Monti. 

STuesd. 

4iWedn. 

5;Thurs. 

6'Fridav 

7jSaturd. 

8' SUN. 

9, Month 
lOTiiesd. 
lljWedn. 
12jThure: 
13 Friday 
14'Satunl. 
IbSUY. 
16! Monti. 
ftTtiesd. 
18|Wedii. 
19jThurs. 

20 Friday 

21 Saturd. 
2%SUJY. 
23-Mond. 

24 Tuesd. 

25 Wedn. 
26Thnrs. 

27 Friday 

28 Saturd 
<29\SUN. 
80;Mond. 
SlTwestf. 



28 8 

28 8 

29 8 
29 8 
SO 8 

50 8| 

51 8 
SI 8, 
32 8 

32 8 
S3 8 

33 8 

34 8 

35 8 
35 8 
36 
37 
33 
3S 

39 8'' 

40 8 

41 8: 

42 8, 

43 8 

44 8! 

45 8 

46 8 

47 8 

48 8' 

49 8 

50 8! 



40 
3|0 

2;o 



10 
00 

U 590 
14 580 
14 57,0 



14 56|0 10 
14 55'0 11 
14 54J0 
14 53|0 
14 52;0 
14 5l|0 
14 50,0 



8;14 48;0 19 

844 46,0 20 

8.14 45!0 22 

844 44*0 23 

14 42|0 24 



14 40 26 


14 380 28 


14 360 30 


14 34 32 


14 32 


34 


14 30 


36 


14 28 


38 


14 26 


40 


14 24 


42 


14 22 


44 


14 20 


46 



7* 10a 


lOw 


7 56' 


28 


S 47 


51 


9 39 


I 23 


10 36 


2 1 


11 38 


2 50 ! 


morn.- 


O ! 'ises 


39 


8 58a 


1 39 


9 31 


2 34. 


10 3 



26 
15 
3 
51 
40 
31 

8 27 

9 23 

10 21 

11 17 

9a 
59 
1 44 
26 

5 



2 
3 

3 43 

4 23 

5 3 

5 46 

6 33 



10 27 

10 50 

11 12 
II 36 
morn. 

2 
37 

1 16 

2 5 

3 2 
© sets. 

8 20a 

8 53 

9 13 
9 31 
9 48 

10 7 
10 26 

10 48 

11 17 



6_ 4 7 24 111 51 



6 10a 


s± 


7 49 


n 


8 38 


i*i 


9 44 


t 


10 33 


t 


11 19 


>? 


morn. 


n 





/vw 


40, 


/VW 


1 20 


AW 


2 6 


X 


"2 49 


X 


3 31 


r 


4 22 


T 


5 25 


H 


6 46 


H 


8 10 


n 


9 16 


n 


10 12 


Z5 


10 57 


£5 


11 3S 


23 


13a 


SI 


45 


SI, 


1 15 


w 


1 40 


n 


2 6 


w 


2 39 


-/\. 


3 17 


-^u 


4 5 


»l 


5 10 


n 


6 36 


t 



833.] JULY— SEVENTH MONTH. [31 days. 




Consider the desolation which would he brought upon your family, if the head 
of it sh >ul(l be taken away. The -lues suffer, in such cases, far more than we, 
fur they have few pleasures except those they derive from their companions in wo. 



Positions of the Sun, Moon am 
Stars T ides, Weathe r, &c. 

Our 



THOMAS COOPER 
Was born inMd. and em-lavedfrom 
his birth, He was scantily fed and 



6Ras Alhague S. 10 25 a. 
7; £ i' 1 perihelioT/. July, 



10; J) perigee. $ rises 2 13 hi. 
1 1 ¥ 6 J) • we H n °t t° place 
I2i £ in superior ^ ©. loo 
13 9 rises 1 50 rri: much con- 
14 : g £ 9 . jidence in them, 

15 !;> sets 48 m. but watch 

16 Ras Algethi S. 9 24a. the 
1-71 £ greatest Hel. Int. N. 
l8 'Q 6 !>• c? 6 D- weather 
l9Ras Alhague S. 9 S2 a. 

20 Rastaben "S. 9 54 a. nar- 

21 Vega S. 10 23 a. rowly as 
2 ' 2 ' £ 6 J>- Middling tides. 
23 Altair S. 11 32 a. we get 
24! 9 rises 1 57 m. our hay 

Z5\2l 6 3> • $ r,ses 1 55 m - 

26 J) apogee, down, and im- 

27 9 ^ $ .Vist^y. prove the 

28 21 sets 9 9 a. time well in 

29 >> sets 11 48 a. getting it 



liUnuk S. 8 54 a. 

2Uj Q- prognostics makefikhed, worked hard, and lodged in a 

^ ] 2 6 D- ottf r<tfA«r ffl wretched hut, which did not shelter 

4 lias Algethi S. 10 13 a. him from the cold of winter and the 
5 : An tares S. 9 21 a. riatny storms of summer. But he loved 
God. About the year 1800, he availed 
himself of his " inalienable right" to 

8 Uastaben S. 10 42 a. l(| run awa .V from his oppressor, leaving 

9 V gets io 20 a. may be behind the name by which his master 
' had known him. and taking another. 

He found work in Philadelphia, where 
he was faithful to his employers, and 
beloved by them. He married a wife 
in Philadelphia, and soon saw around 
him a group of beloved children. But 
in an evil hour a traitor informed his 
old tyrant of the place of his abode. 
He had been guilty of using his own 
legs for his own benefit, and this, in 
the American Republic, is an unpar- 
donable crime. He was seized and 
hand-cuffed, and though his employers 
offered more than he was worth, as a 
slave, yet the man -holder refused to 
let his victim go. In the picture above, 
you see the parting scene. 

While the handcuffs were fastened, 
Thomas, expecting never to see his 
wife again, urged her to bring up the 
children in habits of industry, till she 
could put them with good men who 

30 I2 ^ D • Low 'tides. intojwould teach them to work and take 

31 KfuAabet) S. 9 8 a. the barn. 'core of themselves. 



1, 1834. Emancipation of 800,000 slaves in the British colonies. 
1, 1836. Interesting and joyful celebrations of the above event in the 
British W. I. In Falmouth, Jamaica, there was an exhibition ot'col- 
ored schools in the unfinished Bap. church. 1600 children present. 
In 1822, the W. I. planters were an such " distress ". that they 
prayed Parliament to adopt " prompt " measures " to preserve them 
| from inevitable ruin." — They afterward prophesied thus: " The speedy 
annihilation of slavery would be attended with the devastation ofW.-I. 
colonies, with loss of lives and property to the white inhabitants, with 
inevitable distress and misery to-the black population, and with a fatal 
j shock to the commercial credit of this empiue-" Even Mr. Baring, of 
[London, [a more credible prophet] predicted the ' decline of manufac- 
tures, withering of commerce,' &c. — For results see opposite page. 



MOON'S PHASES. Bay Hour Min. 


, 


Day Hou 


Min. 


O Full Aluon, 12 5 36 a. 


\® Nev/ Moor 


19 11 


39 a. 


d Last Quarter, 1 8 39 m 


.!([ First Quarter, 28 4 


9 m. 


S 


I>. w. 




© 


L. D. 


D.de. 


©sk 


D So. 


J) sets 


H. wa. 


>'s 


Q 


r. 


s. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


m. s. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. vti. 


place. 


1 


Wedn. 4 


51 8 


14 18 48,6 





8 18a 


morn. 


7 57 


t 


1 2 


Thurs. 


4 


52 8 


14' 16:0 50;5 


56 


9 19 


. 34 


9 12 


t 


1 3 


Friday 


4 


53 8 


14 140 52,5 


52 


10 21 


1 32 


10 9 


>? 


4 Saturd. 


4 54 8J14 12 54'5 


47 


11 22 


2 42 


11 


i£ 


h l SUM |4 


55 814 9 57 5 


42 


morn. 


O rises 


11 40 


/vw 


6 


Mond. |4 


56 8 14 7 59 5 


36 


20 


7 58 


morn. 


MV 


7 


Tuesd.4 


57 814 5,1 15 


29 


1 15 


3 23 


25 


X 


8 


Wedn. 4 


59 S44 31 35 


21 


2 3 


3 43 


1 5 


X 


9 


Thurs J 5 


7 ! 14 ill 55 


13 


2 57 


9 11 


1 43 


T 


10 


Friday 5 


1 7 13 584 85 


5 


3 47 


9 33 


2'21 


00 


. 11 


Saturd. 5 


2 7 13 56 1 104 


56 


4 37 


10 2 


3 5 


°f 


12 


SUJV. 5 


3 7|13 53 ! 1*13 4 46 


5 29 


10 35 


3 55 


8 


IS 


Mond. 15 


5 7 13 50 ! 1 15 ! 4 


36 


6 24 


11 14 


5 3 


8 


14 


Tuesd.p 


6 7 13 481 18-4 


25 


7 20 


morn. 


6 28 


n 


15 


Wedn.5 


7 7 13 45 1 214 


14 


8 17- 





7- 56 


n 


16 


Thurs. J 5 


3 7 13 43 1 234 


3 


9 17 


1 


9 11 


£3 


1 17 


Friday \ 5 


10 7 


13 411 263 


51' 


10 7 


2 1 


10 


£5 


1 18 


Siiturd J5 


11 7 


13 39:1 38 3 


38 


10 57 


3 7 


10 44 


SI 


I 19 


SUN. 5 


12 7J1S 361 303 


24 


11 42 


# sets. 


11 20 


& 


9 20 


Mond. 5 


14 7 


13 331 333 


11 


26a 


7 21 


11 52 


1^ 


1 21 


Tuesd.jo 


15 7 


IS 3l|l 352 


56 


1 8 


7 40 


20a 


1^ 


I 22 


Wedn. 5 


16 7 


13 28 1 38 2 


42 


1 47 


7 59 


45 


1^ 


S 23 


Th urs. 5 


13 7 


13 26:1 412 


27 


2 25 


8 16 


1 u 


-TV 


I 24 


Friday 5 


19 7 


l: 24 1 43 2 


11 


3 5 


8 35 


I 41 


-rx 


J 2*5 


Saturd. 5 


20 7 13 21jl 461 


56 


S 46 


8 55 


l 11 


n L 


! 26 


SUM 


5 


21 743 18 1 491 


39 


4 30 


9 20 


2 50 


Hi 


1 27 


Mond. 


5 


23 7.13 151 51 1 


22 


5 18 


9 48 


3 S3 


1T1 


1 2 ^ 


Tuesd. 


5 


24 7 13 12 1 541 


5 


6 11 


10 SO 


4 43 


if 


| 29 


Wedn. 


5 


25 7;13 91 57 1 


48 


7 8 


11 21 


6 9 


f 


1 30 


Thurs. |5 


27 7113' 6 2 0| 


29 


8 8 


morn. 


7 43 


V? 


| 31 


Friday |5 
aoa— a— n 


28 7'13 3 2 S 


10 


9 9 

tOEmmam 


24 


8 53 


V? 



1838.] AUGUST— EIGHTH MONTH. [31 days 



wm 




The slaves are sometimes chained together when they go lo worii in the 
lsst their love of liberty should induce them to make violent efforts to escape. 



*Z I Positions of the San, Moon and 
p I Stars Tides, Weather, &c. 



6 i High tides. Rather cool 
7 h) perigee, J3 6 3> . /or 



^ ($ (y). fA<? season. 
in"?S. ft 



9 £ in £>• ,ve ma y 

10; J v rises 1 36 ra. expect 
\i sets 10 44 a. now and 



11 



RESULTS OF EMANCIPATION. 
A gentleman from Vermont who 
Ras Alhague S. S 41 a. has spent several years in the West 
2 Rastaben S. 9 2 a. Clouds Indies, wrote a letter to Gerrit Smith, 
8 Vega S. 9 37 a. gathering dated Sept. 20, 1836. He gives the 
4iAltair S. 10 45 a. for. ra iny 'result of observation in 4 islands. J. 
5! Q rises 2 9 m. weather. !H. Kimball knew the writer well, and 
"^avs that in his tour in the West Indies, 
n 1837, he saw enough abundantly to 
confirm the statements of this letter in 
every particular. 

Of Trinidad, the writer says : 
All the negroes appeared cheerful and harm- 
less, ami not seldom did 1 hear the remark, 
veri from p' inters, that emancipation was a 
GREAT BLESSING. 

It. was plain to be seen that emancipation 
had been the very thing to take away, at one. 
ind forever, ALL DANGER of violence on 
the part of the colored people! 

In Barbadoes, there were 050,000 
slaves liberated in one day, anions: 
only 20.000 whites. Of this place he 
speaks thus : 

Since the 1st of August, 1834, there has not 
been the slightest popular disturbance or even 
the rumor of one in any part of the Island. 
Ar;d :!ils is not because the blacks are overato- 
td. They are themselves a part of the Island 
militia, and I declare it as my firm convic- 
tion that as ei. peopi' , they are as orderly and 
as little inclined to violence, as any people 
on earth. 
It has done my heart good, to hear people of 
1.011°' Stomi ti™ highest standing here,, and those who 
Wned great numbers of slaves, freely admit 
that their opposition to emancipation was all 
wrong — that it was One of the greatest bless- 
ings that ever came upon the country, and 
that nothing would inpuce them to return to 
^_ 



1 -2 Vega S. 9 3 a. then a 

13 Low tides. shower. 

1 4 Altair S* 10 7 a. 
15b □ (v). Considerable 

' 6 <? o 3> • ra * w mm J 
17! 9 6 J>-' be expected 

18 ? rises 2 31 m. for 
MS 6 21- several days. 

20! Rather high tides. 
21 1 9 in Q. Becomes 

22h) apogee. 21 6 D - , 
23 # greatest elong. E. cool, 

rises 1 27 ra. with 
~o 1? sets 10 S a. indications 
26; Altair S. 9 22 a. of a 

28 Deneb on mer. 10 8 a. 

29 Low tides, of wind 
SO, 9 rises 3 1 m. and 
SllAltair 8. 9 4 a. rain 



\22 SEPTEMBEE fogiftk on SATURDAY. [1838. | 


5, 1835; A large meeting (at a church) in Clinton, Mi., "Resolved, | 


'J'hat abolitionists are ' worthy of immediate death,' and that they f 


would receive it in any part of that State. They also very highly | 


recommended the Colonization Society." 


7, 183a, Ednlund Bellinger, of S. C. , made a long speech to prove that 


slavery is Ji enforced by necessity, sanctioned by religion, and justifi- 


ed by law." 


7, lS3o. Hancock (Me.) Bap. Association, adopted a report declaring 


that, in their opinion, iJ of all the systems of iniquity that ever cursed 


the world, the slave system is the most abominable ;" and that the 


only proper remedy is immediate emancipation. 


| 13, I83:>. General (Congregational) Convention of Vt. adopted a re- 8 


port, declaring their conviction, that slavery will work out for those § 


1 who tolerate it, " individual injustice, impurity and crime, and na- | 


1 


ional wretchedness, and final ruin." 


1 MOON'S PHASES. Day Hour Mfn. 


Day i J .our Min.. | 


O Full Mooiw, 4 1 31 a. 


@ New Monn, 18 4 (i a. 1 


([ List Quarter, 10 5 23 a. 


d First Quarter, 2o 5 18 a. § 


g 


D. W. j © 

jr. s. 


L. D. 


r>.de. 


©fa.p So. p. sets 


|H. WH. 


3>'s 


Q 


h. m. 


h. m. 


m. s.\ h. m. \ h. m. 


\h. m. 


place. 1 


ijSaturd. 


5 30 7 


13 0j2 6 


S 10 8« 


1 97fll 


9 56a 


/VW 1 


| 2SILY. 


5 31 7 


12 58 <2 9 


27 11 5 


2 56 


10 43 


<*w 


SjMorid. 


5 33 7 


12 55 2 12 


46 


morn. 


4 20 


11 27 


/V4V 

AW 


4;Tuesd. 


5 35 7 


12 5112 15 


1 5 





O rises 


morn. 


X 


5 WednJs 36 7 


12 48-2 18 


1 25-1 - 52 


7 20a 


7 


■ X 


I 6lThurs. 5 37 7 


12 46i2 20 


1 45i 1 44 


7 44 


46 


r 


7|Friday 5 39 7!l2 43;2 23 


2 5 ; 2 36 


'8 10 


1 26 


°f 


SjSatord.5 40 7Jl2 41 J2 25 


2 25 3 29 


8 41 


2. 7 




9\SUN. 5 41 7112 J3!2 28 


2 -46 


4 24 


9 18* 


2 53 


8 


lOiMond. 5 42 7J12 36;2 31 


3 6 


5 21 


10 3 


3 46 


n 


HjTuesd.jo 43 7112 33 2 34 


3 .27 


6 20 


10 59 


4 5S 


n 


12JWedn.l5 45 7 12 30,2 36 


3 47 


7 17 


morn. 


6 23 


£5 


13Thurs.J5 46 7|l2 28;2 S9 


4 8 


S 13 


2 


i si 


£5' 


1 14(FridayJS! 48 712 2512 41 


4 291 9 2 


1 6 


8 56 


£5 


15JS£urd^5 49 712 22 ; 2 44 
16 1 SUN. 5 50 7 12 19|2 47 


4 50l 9 49 


2 12. 


9 46 


a ' 


5 11 10 S3 


3 18 


10 26 


a 


17JMond. |5 52 7)12 16 2 50 


5 32 11 15 


4 22 


11 


w 


18iTuesd.'5 53 7!12 14 2 53 


5 5311 54 


©sets. 


11 31 


w 


19 WednJs 55 7:12 112 56 


6 15| 33a 


6 31a 


11 57 


tyj 


20jThurs. 


5 56 712 8 2 59 


6 36| 1 13 


6 50 


lia 


-TV 


21IFriday 


5 57 712 53 1 


6 57i 1 54 


7 10 


53 


-TV 


22JSaturd. 


5 59 7J12 3 3 4 


7 17 2 37 


7 37 


1 22 


n 


28\SUJ\r. 


6 612 03 6 


7 38] 3 24 


8 2 


1 57 


*i 


24 ! Mond. 


6 1 6 11 58 3 -9 


7 59, 4 13 


S 36 


2 S3 


n 


l25Tuesd.|6 2 611 55 3 11 


S 19 5 8 


9 22 


3 30 


t 


p ^jWedn.!6 '-4 6 11 52 3 14 


8 39; 6 5 10 18 


4 35 


t 


||v7iThurs.i6 6 6|il 49:3 IS 


8 59 7 3 


11 24 


6 1 


v? 


I 23 Friday |6 7 6 11 46 3 21 


9 19 S 1 


morn. 


7 34 


VJ 


I 29JSaturd.|6 9 6 11 43 3 24 


9 39 8 58 


40 


8 43 


AW 


1 80 


\SUM_ 


6 10 6 


11 40 


3 27 


9 


59 


9 50 


2 


9 33 


r ~r. 1 



1S3S.] SEPTEMBER— NINTH MONTH. [30 days., 1 




Sometime-; a slave is tied up by the wrists, while the ancles are fastened to a 
staple in the floor. In this position, they are punished with the whip or witti the 
paddle. This is an instrument of torture bored full of holes, each hole raisin;- * ' 
blister. 



| Positions of the Sun, Moon audi 
Stars.... Tides, Weather, ice. ! 



COLONIZATION. 
One powerful moral obstacle in the 
l.Altair S. 9 a. Changeable jw av of the principles of* righteous 
2|Deneb S. 9 50 a. for afcw'YihC'rty is the spirit of COLONIZA- 
31 # <? ©. W 6 D • days •■TIOV. The doctrines put Sforth by 
4Ji> perigee. Very then oe- leading colonizationists, and sanction- 

5 £ sta'y. high tides cowwsN by ihe society, have operated to 

6 Alderamin S. 10 14 a. weld up the half-broken limks of slave- 

7 Q A ?. ' stormy, with -'T's chain, and to prevent masters 

8 Foaialhaut S. 11 41 a. |irom becoming honest, and leaving off 

9 $ greatest Hel. lat. S. fobbing the poor. Forprooflook at 

10 9 rises 3 23 m. wind a«<*' ]; A fe t w f [ acts ? r ° m lhe Fud1ic 
ii't 'i • .Documents of the society. 

1 1| LOW tides. rain. "All emancipation to howerer small an 

lifl J- rises 1 18 in. Becomes extent, which permits the persons emancipated 

1 Sj $ 6 D • fot md P leasani ' l ° remaiU m UliS C ™f£sl*t*?oVkelort. 

■' They will annex the CONDITION that the 
emancipated shall leave the country." 2d do. 
" Emancipation, with the LIBERTY to re- 
main on this side of the AUantic, is but an act 
of dreamy madnessJ i -*~Thirt&?>ith An. Rep. 
Now as it is impossible that any 
k \y^ jt /r* (considerable portion of the slaves canj 
^Oi Rnt&r hi<rh titles ' ~ l be removed at once, it follows that thej 
21 Sram in S 9 21 a h ciet * RECOMMENDS to the slave- 

ooli '5 S Tz> , -ui ■* holders to CONTINUE to HOLD! 
H -, ^ ' l * 6 a Q . • 'SLAVES for the present. And if they j 
23]© enters ^. Aut. begins. are convjnced that this is rig ht NOW, 1 
M Q lii pernehon. of jmc they will believe, and justly too, that; 

25 Fomalhaut S. 10 40 a. U t will be right FOREVER". 

26 Low tides. autumn o. Observe the language of eminent! 

27 9 stationary, weather, [colonization advocates and auxiliaries. 
28$ in Q. with now and ) " When they rifem be transported to the soil 
»Q M»i-W» S m«i4i /7?'tt from whence d^ey were derived., then let them. 
iSMaikah ». 1U c.4 a. l«y»j be emancipated, and not before."- Lou>dV\ 
SOAIpherat S. 1 1 34 a. rain. < Mo.™.) rrfesraph. 



4 ! t □ ©• ^ Wff !/ 
1 5' d d 2^ • n(no ex P ec l 
1 °- 9 d D • several 

1 7| >2. sets S 46 a. days 
lS : (v> eclip. visible. 21 6 D 



24 



gaBgar.rtwww gv^ffgp 



OCTOBER begins on MONDAY. 



[I83& 



IS, 1S3G. The. Western Reserve (().) synod passed resolutions, calling 

slavery " one reigning and mighty form of sin," and added, we 

" earnestly entreat the General Assembly to do all in their power to 

do it' away." 

26, 1836. A yo-ung man born free in- Pennsylvania was hurried into 

. southern slavery by the decision of a justice. (!!!) of the peace in O. 

In the engravings on the next three pages, it will be seen that slavery 

has something to do with the north-. When slaveholders thus trample 

jon all law and justice in their dealings with us, shall we, to accpmmo- 

jdate them, give up the liberty of speech and the pre-?s, and the right of 

j jury trial (as the lion in the fable parted with his teeth and claws), and 

lie down quietly for them to tread .our necks in the dust ? What could 

we expect, when in the power of those who enslaVe their own children ? 



BOON'S PHASE'S. 
O FuH Moon, 
H Last Quarter, 


Dav Hour Man. 1 B;iy Hm:r 
3' 10' 12 m. # New Moon, .18 9 
TO 5 53m.l ([ First Quarter, 26 4 


Min. 
55 in. 
30 m. 


^ I>. W. 

Q 1 


r. s. 


IL m. 


v>.de. 
h. ml 


© fa.; I) So. 
m. s-.j h. m. 


>sets jH. wa.j 
h. mi. ! h. m. j 


)lace. 



IjMond. 
2|Tuesu. 
3 Wedn. 
4!Thurs. 
5 Friday 
dSatuni. 

7\suj\r. 

8) Mt>nd. 

9jTiresd. 

101 Wed n. 

llJThur.s. 



6|11 
? 11 



Friday 
Snturd 
SUN. 
Mood, 
Tuesd. 
Wedn. 
Tbu«. 
Friday 
Saturd. 
SUM 
Woncl. 
Tuesd. 
Wedn. 
25Thuis 
26 Friday 
27! Sa turd. 

2S ! ^r7;v: 

SOjTuesd. 

31: Wedn. 



II 

13 

14 

16 

17 

19 

20 

2* 
16 23 
6 24 6|1 
6 26 
6 27 



6jll 

Gill 



6 29 61 II 



6il0 



6 SO 
6 31 
6 33 6|10 
6 34 6J10- 
6 36 6 10 
6 37 6:10 
6 38 6J10 
6 40 6|l0 
6 41 6,10 
6 42 6 10 



37 3 3010 

34 3 32 ! 10 

31 3 35 10 

23 3 S3; 1 1 

26 3 41 jH 

23 3 44; 11 

20^3 4712 

17 3 4912 

14 3 52! 12 

11 3 5542 

8 3 53.13 

64 ijlS 

34 413 

04 7'l3 

57 4 10|14 

54 4 12.14 

52 4 

49 4 

46 4 20 14 



1514 
18 14 



43 4 
41 4 



23 15 
2615 



44 6 ! !0 

45 6J10 

46 6,10 
43 610 

49 G:10 

50 610 
6 52 6 10 
6 53 6 10 



38 4 29 15 
35 4 31 15 
33 4 34 15 
30 4 37 15 
27 4 39 15 
25 4 42 15 
22 4 45 16 
194 47 16 
17 4 50 16 
144 53 16 



18 10 45« 3 17 
37 11 37 
56; morn 
14' 29 

32 I 23 
50; 2 19 

8j 3 18 

4 IS 
40l 5 17 
56; 6 14 

7 7 

7 56 

4*1 8' 41 

54 9 23 

8 10 2 

24 10 41 

33 11 20 
44: ha 
55j 43 

5 ; 1 29 
15 2 18 
£4 3 10 

4 5 

5 2 
47 5 59 
53 6 54 ill 46 
59 7 47 

3 8 38 
9 28 
11 10 19 
1311 10 




1S3S.] OCTOBER— TENTH MONTH. [31 days. 










THE WAY THEY ; ' CATCH MEN " IN PENNSYLVANIA. 

These men having; felt the horrors of slaver/, fled to Cambria county, Pa., in 
April, 1837. Being pursued, one of them said he would die before he would be 
taken. They w ere shot and voumh d, and then were taken with great difficulty. 
"" Pos 



s of the Sun, Mod 
*tars. . . .Tide s, Weather 

rij). 



Alderarain S. 8 40 a. 
3) perigee. season. 



' l,lt j "Emancipation, without removal from the 
_ * country, is out of the question." — Second IiC- 
Finefor thc\P ort - NeteYork State Col. Soc. 

"The recent murderous movements of the 
people of color, in some of the qo'utl 
evinces th i dreadful cons 

ALL 



■] n ('') cl o-roatest el W a,: '' ti*e.absolute necessity of col mizing ALI 
XT w* \T*A - ■ ' '{free blacks immediately, and of manumitting 
\ ery niffn tides. and colonizing slaves as fast as circi 



Fomalhaut S. 10 a. 

9 vises 4 45 m. Change- 
J rises 1 4 m. able, but 
.ah S. 9 57 a. mild. 
Fomalhaut S. 9 46 a. 

Low tides. Becomes 
$ 6 21- S 6 3) cooler, 

$ rises 1 1 m. with 



l5!Fomalhaut S. 9 27 



n. 



rpogee. <j> greatest Hel 

7 i? I i>;.? d 5 -Pat _N. 



IS R ;..tln-r high tides, wind. 
19jMarkab S~ 9 20 a. and 
SOAIpherat S. 10 20 a. rain. 
21^2 £ D. Mild, but 
22A!ieml>S. 10 17 a. 
23' g rises 54 m. Change- 
24J]ftarkan S. 9 1 a. able. 

25 Alnherat S. 10 1 a* 

26 Al-enih S. 10 2 a. 
27|Lo\v rides. 

6) 



will justify the measure. \V 
have 'for years, that this i.3 the onl 
which will ensure prosperity and safety to our 
southern brethren.'' — A T . If. Observer.* 

What is this but explicitly giving 
die lie to Jehovah's promises in the 
58th chapter of Isaiah ? 

3. Observe the testimony of James 
A. Thome, of Kentucky. 

" I contributed to the funds of the Col. Soc. 

1 igized its measures, and duty bids me 

late that its direct influence upon my mini! 

was to lessen my conviction, of the evil . | 

very, and deepen and sanctify my prejudice 

ie colored race, I knqio the individ- 

ial slaves who are now in bondage by its infln- 

'one. I know the m ■ only 

plea fof continuing in the sin is drawn from the 

Colonization Society." 

4. The results as seen in the census 
of the U. S. are in perfect keeping 
with this testimony. 

From 1790 to 1800, the slaves in that terri- 
tory which now forms the slave states, increas- 
ed 30.2 per. cent, while the free colored popu- 
lation in the same territory increased 89.2 per 
cent. So we see the free colored people 
JBgCWics'hicreased faster than the slaves by 5S-por cent. 
-.7 [This must have been chiefly owing.to volun- 

j) • COOler unlll tary ma riumisskrna From 1800 to 1810, the 

29 Shedir on met". 10 17 a. free colored increased faster than t! e 

, nib S. 9 46 a 
31 J) pon^r-" 1 . ram. Icreased faster than the slaves by only 



[by 41 per-cent. The Col. Soc. was formed in 
1316. Froni 1320 to 1330 the free colored in- 





ls^&s 'iSjai* SB?w^.::-57 



NOV KMBElt begins on THURSDAY. [Is;jS. 



About 15 or 20 years ago, a colored man in New Bedford (Ms.) was 
well known as the honest and industrious keener of a victualling cellar. 
He hud lived there 6 or 8 years, and had a wife and two children. A 
I Virginian coming to Is'ew I'edibrd, coveted his neighbor's body and 
soul, and obtained a warrant lor his arrest, on the pretence that he had 
been guilty of loving liberty better than slavery. The constable went 
with hiin to the cellar, but the Virginian (who must have forgotten that 
he was not in Virginia) seized the tongs and knocked the man down. 
There was soon so much excitement, that the slaveholder, fearing a res- 
cue, suffered his Victim to be arrested on a fictitious charge of debt, up- 1 
on which he was carried to Taunton jail. The action was soon wkh-j 
drawn, and he set free. fJnt the would-be mansteal-er, being arrested. 
for assault and battery, after several wee'vs' imprisonment, was sati'ered 
to go home, minus several hundred dollars, and without his victim. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

O Full Moon, 
C Last Quarter, 



Hour 



Iff in. I 

r>l a. !© New Moon, 

21) a. U First Quarter, 



Hour Mm. 

3 33 m. 

.2 la. 



D. W. 







01a, 2 So. 
m. .s.\ h. in. 



D m 



1 Thurs.|6 

2 Friday 
SSatiird. 
4SUM 
5 .Mond. |6 5! 
6Tuesd.:7 i 
7jWedn.j7 ! 
8iThurs.!7 1 
9,Fridav ! 7 • 

lb;Saturd.j7 I 
ll-SUJY. 17 •' 
12'Mond. \7 ! 
13Tuesd.j7 1 
14! Wed 11. |7 li 
15Thurs.7 1 
16' Friday 7 l! 

17 S amxl. 7 J J 

18 SUM 7 1 

1 9 Mond. j7 1. 
SOTuesri. 7 
2l[Wedn. 
adTburs. 
23 Friday 
24SaElirt) 
2b\SUN. 
26jMon<{. 
27Timsd.' 
28|Wedii.7 24 
29.Thn.rg.J7 23 



la 



16 



15 32' 

15 22 

15 11 

! 15 

'14 431 

14 36 ! 

14 23; 



10 41 

11 25 



12 81 

11 46; 

11 25 
11 4 



10 40 

11 39 



4 47« 


11 30.7| 


5 20 


morn. 


6 1 


15 


6 50 


1 


7 48 


1 50 


8 50 


2 36 


9 59 


3 23 


11 7 


4 17 


morn. 


5 21 


11 


6 30 


1 15 


7 40 


2 19 


8 39 


3 20 


9 27 


4 20 


10 3 


5 23 


10 35 


6 23 


11 8 


@ sets. 


11 42 


5 25a 


IS" 


- G 12 


56 


7 12 


1 39 


8 21 


2 24 


9 33 


3 12 


10 47 


4 17 


morn. 


5 9 


1 


6 23 


1 15 


7 37 


2 30 


8 3S 


3 43 


9 32 


5 6 


10 22 


6 25 


11 10 



1S3S.] NOVEMBER— ELEVENTH MONTH. [30 days 




THE WAY A. VIRGINIAN TREATED A NEW ENGLASDER. [SEE OPTOSITE PAGE.] 

Many of tlte northern States have refused to grant to their own citizens a trial by 
jury, L-st slaveholders should have too much trouble in stealing men. Massachu- 
setts, and New Jersey are the only exceptions. 
?_ ]Po"sitio'n7of the Sun, Moon andj A "CONTRAST. 

.Tides, Weather, fee. J In n73i John Hcnvar(]) who 



was 



devoted his life — the reformation of 
abuses in prisons. In speaking of the 
Fair, /Mji>j°^ stress of prisoners; he says, 

ie circumstance which excited nie to ac- 
tivity in their behalf Was the seeing some, who, 
by the ven I; were declared vot 

guilty ; after having been confined for 
a ] .' ■ (months, dragged back to jail and lucked up 
*fl Gf'^ymg] igahi fill they should pay sundry.'' 



1 ■ Alphcrat S. 34 a. Bain.lihen asberiflf, was aroused to the pros- 
2;Algenib S. 9 34 a. High ecution of the great work to which he 
3 Deheb Kaitos S. 10 1 a. 
4* v in sup. £ ©. Tides. 

5 « in ^3 . 

6 Mirach on mer. 10 10 a. 
l [ g rises 33 in. weather 
%Ul rises 3 43 m. 
9|^t S. 7 43 a. 

*0|cT 6 D - storm of rain, \ This was indeed a flagrant outrage 
lllAlpherat S. 8 53 a. with^od no wonder it stirred up the heart 
1 2* j) apogee, perhaps a dash\wen of a sheriff', to seek a reforra. 
I3\2f/.j). of snow. Cold\ But now, after 60 years have made 
14iAI*enib S. 3 46 a. nights.™* nations ring with the praise of 
I5l0e°n^b Kail. S. 9 12 a. Howard, there exists, at the capital 
ik * •„ ,u ^ 1 t\ « 1 -u ot this <• purest of republics" an 
6; g in aph. 2 6J> • 3 6 h J abuse as m £ eh worse tha J n that which 

"1*1 6 i>- $ 6 J> : 1 uallei j a w<? /^/r//y was forced to spue out of 
18 jE stationary, high tides.-j her mou ^ as a man , s L1BEKTY is 
19jMirach on mer. 9 22 a. [worth more than 18 pence a week. But 
20|MenkarS. 11 10 a. -*" e jhas not our democratic president urged 
11 : f? rises 17 m. clouds h t upon Congress to provide instant re- 
dress ? On the contrary, he has 
threatened to veto any law which they 
may pass, abolishing a system of 
foiwhich this outrage forms a part, un- 
less it should receive the assent of 
[those who practice such enormities. 
NOTICE. Was committed to the prison 
23i J) perigee. get on rt; of Washington co. D. C. May 19, 1334, .-is a 

29 J i 1], snowy COm-'i runaway, . . . DAVID PECK. He s;iya he is 



22 J/ rises 3 4m. are 
2 H^ !©• beginning 
24 Deneb Kait. S. 3 35 a. 
25|#: £ J). 'Low tides. 
26jMirach on mer. 8 52 a.- 
27]MenkarS. 10 40 a. 



30 g rises 1 1 53 a. plexion. 



jFREE. The OWNER is requested, & 

! he will be SOLD as the LAW "" 




_:^^<^~.-_zz". 



■^sr-T-jv ~: -:rr~ 




DECEMBER begins on SATURDAY" 



6, 18*36. The queen of Portugal decreed the abolition of the slave 
trade, among all her subjects. 

7, 1835. Andrew Jackson, in his Message to Congress, accused the 
abolitionists of " unconstitutional and wicked attempts," and recom- 
mended the destruction of the liberty of the press, in order to stop 
their interference with slavery. 

18, 4835. An animated debate 'in Congress was called forth by a peti- 
tion of some ladies in Wrentham, for the abolition of slavery iri the 
Dis. of Columbia. On the 23d, the petition was laid on the table by 
a vote of 144 to 66. The ladies can liherate.the slaves if they will. 

19, 1829. Act of Georgia annexing the lands of the Cherokees to the 
several counties in their vicinity, and denying to Indians the privilege 
of witnessing in courts of justice. 



COVIN'S PHASES. Day Hour Min. Day Hour Min. 


O Full Moon, 1 7 1 m. 


C[ First Quarter, 23 10 


22 a. 


d Last Quarter, 8 6 20 a. 


O Full Moon, 30 7 


48 a! 


Q New Moon, 16 7 43 a. 






§ 


D. W. 


© 


L,. D. 


D.de. g)fa.JJ) So. \J>tis. 


jH. wa 


. 3>'s 


Q 


r. s. 


h. in 


h. m 


. m. s>\ h. in. \h. ' in 


\k, in 


. place 


1 


Siitiifd.lT 26 5,9 9 5 53 10 43 


morn. 


! 4 29a 


11 59fl 


n 


2\SITJY. [7 26 59 7 6 OlO 20 


40 


5 25 


mora. 


25 


SMond. 7 27 5 ! 9 5 6 1; 9 56 


1 1 42 


6 30 


44 


25 


4Tue.?d.'7 27 5J9 4 6 2 1 9 3.2 


2 41 


7 38 


1 27 


25 


5 Wedn.;7 28 5J9 3 6 3 9 7 


3 35 


S 47 


2 8 


£1 


6Thurs.j7 28 5 9 2" 6 4; 8 42 


! 4 24 


9 54 


2 46 


St 


7 Friday |7 29 5 9 16 5 1 8 16 


; 5 11 


10 58 


3 28 


Tfl? 


8 Saturth 7 29 5 9 ,6 6 7 50 


! 5 51 


mora. 


4 12 


17% 


9 SUM |7 30 5 ! 8 59 6 7 1 7 23 


: 6 31 


1 


5 6 


-Q- 


lOiMond. 7 30 5 ! 8 59 6 S ; 6 56 


| 7 9 


1 


6 8 


£V 


IlTuesd.7 31 68 53 6 9 6 28 


7 43 


2 1 


7 18 


-Q. 


12.Wedn.l7 31 5 : S 57 '6 10' 6 


8 29 


3 3 


8 20 


H 


lS,Thurs.i7 32 5:8 56 6 11 5 32 


9 11 


4 6 


9 12 


"I 


14 Friday J7 32 58 55 6 11 5 3 


9 57 


5 13 


9 57 


f 


15SatHrd.i7 33 5|8 55 6 12 4 34 10 4S 


6 20 


10 39 


t 


16 SUN. 


7 33 58 55 6 12 4 5 


11 42 


$ sets. 


11 19 


t 


l7|Mond. 


7 33 5'8 54 6 13 3 36 


33a 


4 51a 


11 59 


>? 


ISTuesd. 7 S3 5 3 54 6 13 3 6 


1 35 


5 59 


S9a 


>? 


19,Weiln.J7 33 5 ! 3 53 6 13 2 36 


2 31 


7 12 


1 20 


/VW 


20Thurs. 7 33 5'8 53 6 13 2 6 


3 25 


8 27. 


2 2 


/vw 


21 Friday 7 S3 5!s 53 


6 14' 1 36 


4 16 


9 42 


2 45 


X 


22Sat.ird 7 33 5'S 53 


o.in. 1 1 6 


5 3 


10 54 


3 31 


X 


23 SUN. 7 33 53 53 


36 


5 50 


morn. 


4 21 


°(° 


24'Mond. ; 7 S3 5<S 54 


1 6 


6 36 


7 


5 22 


T 


25Tuesd.;7 33 5 3 54 


1 slo. 23 


7 26 


1 19 


6 36 




26jWedn.'7 33 53 54 


1 


53 


8' 17 


2 36 


7 52 


y 


27Thurs. 7 33 5 3 55 


1 


1 23 


9 13 


3 53 


9 1 


y 


l 23 Friday 7 32 5 8 55 


1 


1 52 10 11 


5 11 


9 59 


n 


29.Saturd.!7 32 58 56 


2 


2 22 11 12 


6 23 


10 51 


n 


30 l SUM. 17 31 53 56 


2 2 51 


morn. 


O rises .11 37 


25 


SllMond. [7 30 5!3 57 


3 3 20 ; 11 


5 4a : morn. 1 


25 



1S3S.] DECEMBER— TWELFTH MONTH. [31 days.; 




TUB WAY THE FRIENDS OF LIBERTY ARE TREATED IN AMERICA. 

On the 28th of January. 1837, John Hopper, of N. York, was lynched at Sayan 
nah. because his father belonged to the same society with Jay, Hush ami Franklin 



Positions of the Sun, Moon and 
Stars Tides, Weather, &c. 



2 
S 
A 

5 
G 
7 
8 
9 
10 

12 Mira S. 8 52 a. Jineplcas- 
ISMenkar S. 9 30 a. ant 
14| Algol on mer. 9 29 a. 
1 5 I h 6 J) • weather. 
,6 | 9 6 !>• Rather high 
17, o greatest elong. E. tides. ' 
lSi § in sup. <$©. 8 <* }>. 
19 Algeneb on mer. 9 22 a. 
20: %6 21- Fair 

21j7*s S. 9 39 a. weather. 

22: (v) entersVJ.Wint. begins. 
23 Akleharan S. 10 23a.CoM 
24; $ rises 113a. Rather low 
25;^) Per. gsta'y.S & -tides. 
26.7*3 S. 9 17 a. with 

27j greatest Hel. Lat. S. 
28 Alclebaran S. 9 57 a. 



NORTHERN SLAVEHOLDERS. 
D ©. Pretty high tides. J - w - Bryan, of N. Y. City, adver- 
Mira S. 9 36 a. After sev- tlsed ' in a southern paper of Sept. 6, 
Menkar S. 10 14 a. era/ , 18 f > a lot of "valuable negroes of 
Algol on mer. 10 13 a. I' 01 ] 1 'f xes for ^le '' Ihey were then 
■h \.;««o 11 ^o ^7«,,o «/• m Dallas county, Alabama. 

,? rises 11 o'J a. dais 0/1 T . „,, -,'., r r. , u 

w .„ . t u , i . c I Israel 1 horndike, ol Boston, who 

greatest riet. lat. o. r -, , ., j j . L .u 

f- 6 . ,, ~ , 7 . . failed recently, pretended to be the 
21 rises 2 3 m threatening, 0WNER of J la F lot of hunian be . 
f/ rf }> . w««/t some snow, ; ngg in Cuba> Q ; e of the anti . oboli . 
$ □ (£. Low tides, ire |tion speakers at the Faneuil Hall meet- 
J) apogee. may expecJ a j ng is close)y connected with slavery in 
21 6 3) • S in 23- spetf o/the same island. 



A Northern Slave. Committed 
to the jail of Warren county (Mis.), 
June 3, 183(5, a negro boy who says 
his name is Samuel Bryen ; light com- 
plexion ; Bays that he is a FREE boy, 
and lives in ;\ew York, in Orange st. 
(signed,) Wm, Evekett. 

The law of Mississippi in this case 
may be learned from p. 35. Similar 
laws exist in the other slaveholding 
states, except in Maryland. %*The 
Haws in Md. are milder than in D. C 



The slaveholders have 25 members 
of Congress, and 25 electors of presi- 
dent, who are representatives of slave*. 
They are paid out of the national trea- 

29;g 8 ©. squalls of snow, I on an avera g e> $30,000 per year. 

30! $ in perihelion. Lovy V ° * ' 

31 earth nearest ©. tides.) Monthly Concert last Mond. of each month.' 



30 



Anti- Slavery Alma. c. 



[JS33: 



AN ITEM OF HISTOR^. 
On the first of January, 1831, the first number of the Liberator 
was published in Boston by W. L. Garrison and Isaac Knapp. Dur- 
ing the latter part of that year a few individuals determined to form 
an Ann-Slavery Society. The first meeting was held December 10, 
1831, and the second on January 1, 1832, when the Constitution was 
reported and accepted. An adjourned meeting was held on January 
6, at which, after much discussion, the following preamble was 
adopted, and the society called the New England Anti-Slavery 
Society. This was the parent of the 1100 societies now existing. 

" We, the undersigned, hold that every person, of full age and sane 
mind, has a right to immediate freedom fcom personal bondage of 
whatsoever kind, unless imposed by the sentence of the law for the com- 
mission of some crime. — We hold that man cannot, consistently with 
reason, religion, and the eternakind immutable principles of justice, be 
the property of man.— We hold that whoever retains his fellow-man 
in bondage is guilty of a grievous wrong.— We hold that mere differ- 
ence of complexion is no reason why any man should be deprived of 
any of his natural rights, or subjected to any political disability. — 
While we advance these opinions as the principles on which we 
intend to act, we declare that we will not operate on the existing 
relations of society by other than peaceful and lawful means, and 
that we will give no countenance to violence or insurrection." 
The Constitution was then signed by the following persons, 
with one -exception, were then residing in Boston, viz: 
William Lloyd Garrison, John E. Fuller, 

Isaac Knapp, Moses Thacher, 

Joshua Coffin, Arnold Buffum, 

Eobert B. Hall. Benjamin C. Bacon, * 

William J. Snelling, Henry K. Stockton, 

Stillman B. Newcomb, Oliver Johnson. 

At the adoption of the Constitution, January 1, the following per- 
sons were present, who would have signed it, with the preamble, at 
the meeting on January 6, dould they have had the opportunity, viz. 
Alonzo Lewis, of Lynn, Abijah Blanchard and John Cutts Smith, of 
Boston. 

Officers of the Society for 1832. 
Arnold Buffum, Pres. ; James C. Odiorne, 1st V. P. ; Alonzo 
Lewis, 2d V. P. ; Wm. Lloyd Garrison, Cor. Sec. ; Joshua Coffin, 
Rec. Sec; Michael H. Simpson, Treas. ; Moses Thacher, John E. 
Fuller. Oliver Johnson, Robert B. Hall, Benjamin C Bacon, and 
Samuel E. Sewall, Counsellors. 



who, 



PRINCIPLES OF ABOLITIONISTS. 

I Extracts from the Constitution of the American And- Slavery Society. 

Art. II. The object of this Society is the entire abolition of slavery 

in the United States. While it admits that each State in which 

J slavery exists has, by the Constitution of the United States, the ex- 

i elusive right to legislate in regard to its abolition in said State, it 

I shall aim to convince all our fellow-citizens, by arguments addressed 

to their understandings and consciences, that slave-holding is a HE I- 



1S3S] 



Anti-Slavery Almanac. 31 



NOUS SIN in the sight of God, and that the DUTY, SAFETY and 
BEST INTERESTS -of all concerned, require its immediate abandon- 
ment, without expatriation. The Society will also endeavor, in a 
constitutional way, to influence Congress to put an end to the domes- 
tic slave trade, and to abolish slavery in all those portions of our 
common country which'-come under its control, especially in the 
District of Columbia, — and likewise to prevent the extension of it to 
any State that may hereafter he admitted into the Union. 

Akt. III. This Society shall aim to elevate the character and 
condition of the people of color, by encouraging their intellectual, 
moral and religious improvement, and by removing public prejudice, 
that thus they may, according to their intellectual and moral worth, 
share an equality with the whites of civil and religious privileges ; 
but this Society will never, in any way, countenance the oppressed in 
vindicating their rights by resorting to physical force. 



SOUTHERN TESTIMONY. 
A Somerset. 

A few years ago a strange delusion had obtained entire ascendency 
over the public mind. Slavery had been so long written about, talked 
of, and prayed over, as u a great evil" that most people really supposed 
it was, like the cholera, the yellow fever or the pestilence, a "dispen- 
sation of Providence," to be patiently endured, until the same Power 
which sent it among us should, " in his own good time," remove it. 
The slave-holders at the south adopted the same language; and pite- 
ous indeed were their lamentations about the "entailed curse," the 
"dread calamity," the "sad inheritance," and the "heavy burden." 
But when the question of the admission of Missouri was agitated, in 
IS 19, they then assumed the altitude of a snarling cur, with a litter 
of young puppies. They suddenly stopped their whining, and com- 
menced growling and showing their teeth, and bristling up their 
mane, as if something dear as their very existence was at stake. 
They threatened to dissolve the Union unless the burden beneath 
which they were groaning should be bound upon the shoulders of that 
young State. The north was frightened, and consented to please the 
south, by extending the sore evil with which they were already 
afflicted. 

This excitement was soon almost forgotten, and the south resumed 
her former lamentations about the" "great evil." They desired the 
sympathy of the north for their sufferings, if they could have it without 
a rebuke for their guilt. The Colonization Society humored the same 
feeling, and used corresponding language. This was the state of 
things in 1830, when a very few philanthropists were aroused to a 
contemplation of the wickedness of slave-holding. They spread the 
truth before the minds of the nation, till many consciences were 
aroused from their death-like slumber. 

Slave-holders perceived that their own admissions were fatal to trie 
institution to which their hearts, by long habit, had become wedded, 
and, with an inconsistency natural to guilt and error, they flatly 
contradicted theirown former statements, and pronounced slavery to 
be a great blessing. 

We here intend to put on record a few of the avowals they for- 



merly made. They could have no motive to make things appear 
worse than they really were. 

Slavery fatal to the Peace of the Whites. 

The following is from a " Letter to a Member of the Virginia Le- 
gislature/' published at Richmond, Va^, and republished at Balti- 
more, in 1801. 

" You must have observed that some truths, which their SELF- 
EVIDENCE and importance have rendered familiar to the mind, 
are. on this very account, often disregarded. Of this nature is the 
ganger arising from domestic slavery. EVERY MAN is persuaded 
of the reality of this danger ; no man denies its magnitude." " ALL 
agree that the danger is great and CERTAIN." 

" The increase of knowledge is the principal agent in evolving the 
spirit we have to fear. The love of freedom, sir, is an inborn senti- 
ment, which the God of nature has planted deep in the heart : long 
may it be kept under by the arbitrary institutions of society ; but, at 
the first favorable moment, it springs forth, and flourishes with a 
vigor that defies all check." " They [the slaves] possess the physi- 
cal power of doing us mischief; and are invited to it by motives 
which self-love dictates, which REASON JUSTIFIES'! ! " 

What more fatal stab could slavery receive ? The writer occupies 
two or three pages in showing that "no system of rigor can reach 
the first causes of the evil," and says he dwells upon this " because 
it is the favorite topic of the 'day," and adds, " Whenever we are in- 
volved in war, if our enemies hold out the lure of freedom, they will 
have, in EVERY NEGRO, a DECIDED FRIEND." 

From the speech of Mr. Moore in the Virginia House of Delegates, 
1832. V I think that slavery, as it exists among us, may be regarded 
as the HEAVIEST CALAMITY which has ever befallen any por- 
tion of the human race. If we look back through the long course of 
time which has elapsed from the creation to the present moment, we 
shall scarcely be able to point out a people whose situation was not 
in many respects preferable to our own, and that of the other states in 
which negro slavery exists. True, sir, we shall see nations which 
have groaned under the yoke of despotism for hundreds and thousands 
of years, but the individuals composing those nations have enjoyed a 
degree of happiness , peace ', and freedom from apprehensions, which the 
holders of slaves in this country can NEVER KNOW." 

A letter from Virginia, dated about the same time, says : " These 
insurrections have alarmed my wife so as really to endanger her health, 
and I have not slept without anxiety for three months. Our nights are 
sometimes spent in listening to noises. A corn song or a hog call has 
often been a subject of nervous terror, and a cat in the dining-room 
will banish sleep for the night. There is a panic in all this country." 

i Virginian once invited a friend of mine into his sleeping-cham- 
ber, and showed him a GUN and TWO PISTOLS, declaring thru for 
20 years, he had not been to bed without first examining their priming, 
that he might be sure they were ready to use at a moment's warning. 

Immediate abolitionists wish to remove the cause of th ; s wretched- 
ness and alarm. Would slaves injure their friends ? Certainly not. 
Then let all the slave-holders become their friends, and all will be safe. 



1838] 



Anti- Slavery Almanac. 



PICTURES OF SLAVERY BY SLAVE-HOLDERS. 
We are often cautioned against receiving Ftaterrients of northern- J 
ers respecting slavery ; and as for the stories of the slafbs them- j 
selves, there are multitudes who never for a moment entertain the j 
idea of giving them credit. The slave-holder, though a part;/ con- j 
cerned, arid of course inadmissible as a witness in a court of justice, \ 
is the only witness admitted by many to the court of the American 
public. Even this witness we have not the privilege of cross-question- j 
irig; We can only listen to his own story in his own case, and then | 
make the most of it. Let us .call a few such to the stand. [On this 
point the reader is referred to The Evils and Cure of Slavery, by Mrs. 
Child ; A. S. Record, Vol. III. No. 1 ; Address of Ky. Synod,' &c] 

I. The first point to be proved is that slaves are often TREATED 
WITH GREAT CRUELTY. 

The following is from thd Clinton (Miss.) Gazette, July 23d, 183(3. 
WAS COMMITTED 

TO the jail of Covington county a negro man. who says his name 
is JOSIAH. He is heavy built, copper-colored, his buck VERY 
MUCH SCARRED with the whip, and BRANDED on t he thigh 
in three or four places, thus (I. M.) or (J. M.) ; the M. is very plain, 
but the I. or J. is not plain ; the rim of his right ear has been bit or cut 
off. The owner, <5cc. J. L. Jolley, Sheriff C. C. 

" Williamsburg, June 28th, 1836. 

The following is from the speech of Mr. Moore, beforre referred 
to. The object of this speech is not to show the wrongfulness of 
slavery, but its impolicy. The testimony is therefore incidental. 
Mr. Moore is contending that "it is impossible, in the nature of 
things, that slaves can be virtuous and moral." 

"He is habituated, from his earliest infancy, to sacrifice truth with; 
out remorse as the only means of escaping punishment, which is too. 
apt to be inflicted, WHETHER MERITED OR NOT. The can- 
did avowal of the fault, which a kind parent is disposed to regard in 
his child as the evidence of merit, is SURE to be considered by the 
master as INSOLENCE in a slave, and to furnish additional reason 
for inflicting punishment upon him. The slave perceives that he 
can never attain to the least distinction in society, however fair and 
unexceptionable his conduct may be ; and that however INNOCENT 
"he may be, he is OFTEN liable to the SEVEREST PUNISHMENT, 
at the will of hireling overseers, without even the form of a trial." 

What sort ..of men are the overseers? Let Mr. Wirt (a Vir- 
ginian) answer. "Last and lowest, a feculum of beings called 
overseers — the most abject, degraded, unprincipled race." 

We might fill this No. with their own published records of cruelty. 

II. The second point is that FAMILY TIES ARE OFTEN 
BROKEN UP. 

£>£)() DOLLARS REWARD.— Absconded from my estate in 
^*J\J -Goochland county* (Dover,) in August last, slave WASP] 
INGTON . . . very active and sprightly. He was purchased of 
M'Lane's estate, in January, 1S36, at George's tavern in Goochland 
— had been a waterman on James River'for several years ; is well 



34 



Anti- Slavery Almanac. 



[1838 



known and - has a WIFE and other relations about Columbia and 
Cartersville, where it is believed he may now be found. I will pay a 
reward of $100 for his delivery to my manager at Dover,' $50 if se- 
cured in any jail in Virginia so that 1 may get him again, or $250 
if taken out of the State and restored to me. JOHN HETH, 

Jan. 30, 1837. Richmond P. O. 

It seems that, instead of being " anxious to get rid of them," they 
become more and more anxious to get them back the farther off they 
g et - 

$9^ REWARD. Ranaway, my man CHARLES. HIS WIFE 
W&lJ was carr ied off in April last by Mr. Wilkins Edwards, of 
Mississippi. 

The above reward, flee. WILLIAM JONES, 

Of Lombardy Grove, Mecklenburgh, Va. 

Sept. 23, 1836. 

But as no man who understands the subject will deny this proposi- 
tion, I will not enlarge. The reader will of course remember that 
large class of advertisements offering " cash and the highest price for 
likely YOUNG negroes of BOTH sexes from TWELVE to TWEN- 
TY-FIVE,'' &c. How can these be had without tearing families 
asunder? A Virginian lately told me this was done "oftentimes-" 
A young Virginian attending Harvard University said to me that he 
had had a hand in such transactions,- and expected to again. 

III, The third point to be proved is that these slaves have the 
qualifications for TAKING CARE OF THEMSELVES. 

A Liberal Reward for PETER, Confectioner and Baker. 1836. 

$5Q for JOHN, very intelligent. 1836. 

FOR SALE. A negro woman, a good plain cook, washer and 
ironer, is honest, sober, and of good disposition. 1836. 

A Liberal Reward for ROSANNA, intelligent, quick spoken, and 
capable of giving an account of herself. If any honest man knows 
any thing concerning her, it is hoped that he will give me immediate 
notice. Vicksburg, Aug. 29, 1836. WM. A. BRICKELL. 

For sale, a very likeiy negro girl, of most excellent character, ac? 
customed to housework and nursing. 

A negro girl, about 15 years old, a good house servant or FIELD 
HAND. ' Apply at this office. Augusta, Ga. Constitutionalist. 
[Printed by a native of New England.] 

For sale, the girl MARIA, aged 16, a good cook, and guarantied a 
thorough servant: for smartness SHE CANNOT BE EXCELLED. 
March, 1837. [Color not mentioned.] 

A Liberal Reward for FREDERICK. He is sufficiently intelligent 
and cunning 'to evade the ordinary means of detection. March, 1837. 

IV. The fourth point is that slavery is a great system of AMAL- 
GAMATION, and that our southern brethren often ENSLAVE their 
CHILDREN and other near relatives. 

$1 00 REWARD will be given for the apprehension of my ne- 
W±\JV gro EDMUND KENNEY, alias ROBERTS. He has 
STRAIGHT hair, and a complexion so nearly WHITE, that a stran- 



J1S3S] 



Anti- Slavery Almanac. 



35 




ger would suppose there was NO African blood in him. He is so 
very artful, that in his language it is likely he will deceive those who 
might suspect him. He was with my boy Dick a short time since in 
Norfolk, and offered him for sale, and was apprehended, but escaped 
under the PRETENCE of being a WHITE MAN. 

ANDERSON BOWLES, 
Jan. 6, 1837. Dentonville P. 0. 

tSlOO REWARD. 
j 13 ANA WAY from James Hughart, Paris, Ky., 
^jc/-*^ tb - e Mulatto Boy NORBON, aged about 15 
js j years; a very bright mulatto, ^nd would be taken 
for a WHITE BOY if not closely examined ; his 
hair is black and STRAIGHT. Aug. 4, 1836. 

ABSCONDED from the subscriber, her negro man JOHN. He 
has a very LIGHT complexion, prominent nose, &e. 
Charleston Mercury, 1837. W. J. SANGL01S. 

8100 REWARD. 

RANAWAY from the Subscriber, living in Sumter 
Co. Ala., a bright mulatto man slave named SAM, 
calls himself SAM"PETTIGREW* . . . LIGHT SAN- 
DY HAIR and blue eyes, RUDDY complexion, very 
stout built, and will weigh about ISO pounds ; he is 
?o white as very easily to pass for a free white mam. . . He carries 
a small memorandum book in his pocket, and will pass very easily 
for a white man unless closely examined — is a first-rate blacksmith 
and barber. EDWIN PECK. 

Mobile, April 22, 1837. 

V. The fifth point to be proved is that FREE men are often sold 
into slavery io pay the expense of THEIR OWN UNJUST IMPRIS- 
ONMENT. 

SHERIFF'S SALE. 

COMMITTED to the Jail of Warren County, by Win. Everett, 
one of the JUSTICES of said county, a Negro MAN who calls 
himself JOHN J. ROBINSON; says that he is FREE. The 
OWNER of the said BOY is requested to come forward, prove 
PROPERTY, pay charges and take him awav. or he will be dealt 
with as the law directs. WM. EVERETT, Jailer. 

And how does the law direct ? Read the following : 

NOTICE is hereby given, that the above described BOY, who 
calls himself John J. Robinson, having been confined in the 
Jail of Warren county as a Runaway for six months — and having 
been regularly advertised during this period, — I shall proceed to SELL 
said Negro boy .at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash, at 
the door of the Court-house in Vicksburg, on Monday, 1st day of Au- 
gust, 1836, between the hours of 1 1 o'clock A.M. and 4 o'clock P. M. 
of said day, in pursuance of the STATUTE in such cases made 
and provided. E. W. MORRIS, Sheriff. 

Vicksburg, July 2, 1836. 

* So we might, perhaps, see, "ARCHY, calls himself ARCHY MOORE," adver- 
tised by Cot. Carter. 



36 



Anti- Slavery Almanac 



[J838 



In the same paper it is advertised that DICK COLEMAN, who j 
says that he is a free inhabitant of Tennessee, will be SOLD at j 
public Auction, &c. - 

Let it be observed, that these men are seized and imprisoned 
without proof that they were ever slaves. Instead of the men being 
presumed to be free till they were proved to be slaves, they are sold 
into slavery after they are virtually PROVED to be FREE. If any I 
man had lost such slaves, he would of course be on the lookout, and j 
it would be almost impossible, for him net to hear of their being 
advertised. And after being advertised six months, the presumption 
that they were free would fall little short of absolute certainty. 



VI. The sixth point to be proved is that such is the state of public 
sentiment at the south, that slave-holders are not ashamed to ADVER- 
TISE that they are MURDERERS ! ! ! 

^9|]f| REWARD. — Ran away from the subscriber about three 
Wr^iJXJ y ears G g 0) a negro man named BEN ; also one ether ne- 
gro by the name of RIDGDON, who ranaway about "the 8th of this 
month. I will give the above reward of $100 for each of the above 
negroes, &c. or for the KILLING of them so that I can see them. 
November 12, 1836. W. D. COBB. 



WHAT HAS THE CHURCH TO DO WITH SLAVERY? 

The following article was communicated by a clergyman whose 
father is a slave-holder in the District of Columbia. He was former- j 
ly an agent of the Colonization Society, but he became convinced i 
that that Society was the handmaid of slavery, and abandoned it. 
He is now laboring zealously in the cause of emancipation. If such 
things are publicly practised by ministers in Maryland, .who can 
conceive the atrocities perpetrated by unprincipled planters in the 
extreme south ? 

( Perry ville, near Valley P.. 0., 
N. Southard, j Pa., March 28th, 1837. 

Dear Sir : Accept the following as a mite cast into your trea- 
sury of facts, in regard to that odious and impious system of 
slavery that curses our country, and desecrates the sanctuary, pollul- 
j ing the priest and staining the church with blood. It has been com- 
municated to me by a dear brother in the ministry of the gospel, 
like myself raised in the South, and familiar with slavery, but who is 
not yet wholly an Abolitionist. Accept this communication from my- 
self, as a feeble expression of my detestation of a system of " Robbe- 
ry, Lust, Barbarism and Impiety," sanctioned though it be by human 
laws, and fathered by the professing church. And were the dear 
brother, of whom I speak, present with me, now while I write, I 
doubt not he would say, " accept this statement as my joint testimony 
against that system, with which, as Southerners born, we. are ac- 
nnainted." Let me add, I pray you to accept this communication, 
as a small thank-offering on my part to Almighty God, for my deliver- 
ance from that prejudice against our colored brethren, which was 
begotten and fostered in my heart by the devil and Colonization. 

Yours, &c. JAMES NOURSE. 



1S3S] 



Anti- Slavery Almanac. 



The Rev. Mr. M , how of ihe Huntingdon Presbytery, after an 

absence of many months, was about visiting his old friends on what 
is commonly called'fhe "Eastern Shore." Late in the afternoon, on 

his journey, he called at the house of Rev. A. C. of P town, Md. 

With this brother he had been long acquainted. Just at that junc- 
ture Mr. C. was about proceeding to whip a colored female, who was 
his slave. She was firmly tied to a po^st in FRONT of his dwelling- 
house. The arrival of a clerical visitor at such a time, occasioned a 
temporary delay in the execution of Mr. C.'s purpose. But the delay 
was only temporary ; for not even the presence of such a guest could 
destroy the bloody design. The guest interceded with ail the mild- 
ness yet earnestness of a brother and new visitor. But all in vain, 
'•' the woman had been saucy and must be punished." The cowhide 
was accordingly produced, and the Rev. Mr. C, a large and very 
stout man, applied it " manfully " on " woman's " bare and " shrink- 
ing fiesh." I say bare, because you know that the slave women gen- 
erally have but about three or four inches of the arm near the shoul- 
der covered, and the neck is left entirely exposed. As the cowhide 
moved back and forward, striking right and left, on the head, neck 
and arms, at every [e\v strokes the sympathizing guest would ex- 
claim, " 0, Brother C, desist." But Brother C. pursued his brutal 
work, till, after inflicting about sixty lashes, the woman was found to 
be suffused with blood on the hinder part of her neck, and under her 
frock between the shoulders. After the punishment was over, and 

the woman dismissed, Mr. M took advantage of an opportunity 

which occurred, affectionately to reprove the brother who had so 
grossly offended against decency, and justice, and mercy. Some 
others, members of the family, united with him in reprobating the 
affair.' The reply, however, is worthy of note, viz. that he (Mr. C.) 
had done it before, but it was a dirty business, and he believed he never 
mould do it again. Yet this Rev. gentleman is well esteemed in the 
church — was, three or four years since, moderator of the synod ot 
Philadelphia, and yet walks abroad, feeling himself unrebuked by 
law or gospel. Ah, sir, does not this narration give fearful force to 
the query — What has the church to do milk slavery ? Comment on the 
facts is unnecessary, yet allow me to conclude by saying, that it is 
my opinion such occurrences are not rare in the south. - J. N. 



REASONS FOR AMERICAN SLAVERY. 

Before naming any of them, it may be remarked that none of 
them are "probably very strung. Strong men are not apt to cry out 
for help. Strong reasons are never afraid to meet weak ones alone. 
But the reasons for slavery are always calling in BRUTE FORCE 
to their aid. Let us see what some of these reasons can say for them- 
selves. 

1. The slaves arc an inferior race. 

Then why make laws against teaching them? One would think, 
from the pains taken to keep them from learning, they were terrible 
scholars. Lock books from numbskulls ! — and by acts of the Legis- 
lature too! Which end of sum laws do the biggest fools stand at? 
Ask the schoolmasters. 

But suppose they fire inferior, what then? They are only an in- 



38 



Ant i- Slavery Almanac 



[183S 



ferior race of men — MEN, after all, and not brutes. If their inferior- 
ity justly makes them slaves, then all inferior sort of people ought tO' 
be slaves. Many who are now free should be reduced to slavery. 
There should be government inspectors of humanity — measurers or 
weighmasters of brains, who should chalk every man's size, weight 
and quality on his forehead, as if he were a barrel of pork or macke- 
rel, so that we might know what people to enslave and what to leave 
at liberty. Those found below a certain mark (we don't profess to 
know who is to fix it) should be set up at auction directly. Such 
people were plainly never designed to have pay for their work, to 
own property, to have inalienable rights, &c. &c. This reason for 
slavery is too good by half. - 

2. The slaves are black. 

This we believe is one of the strongest reasons for their enslave- 
ment. We have heard of a slave-holding lady, who, when pressed 
for reasons, could give no other. At length she was helped to an- 
other almost equally strong by an idiot who stood by, and, perceiving 
her embarrassment, sagely exclaimed ''Mother, they've got woolly 
heads too." " Yes, they've got woolly heads too" repeated the lady ! 

These powerful reasons are almost the only ones which do not 
apply with equal force to the enslavement'of the whites. 

3. Slavery always has existed in some shape or other. 

A very good and useful argument this. It may be summed up 
thus : whatever has been, ought to be. It would help all sorts of thieves, 
if some were not too modest to aceept its services. It is good for 
drunkenness and fornicatic-n. It can also turn a hand to cutting 
masters' throats. We therefore advise the masters to keep -it to them- 
selves, and not lend it to other malefactors. Note. The learned 
Professor Dew and others have gained great glory by the use of this 
argument. 

4. The slaves could not take care of themselves, if they were set free. 
When and where was the trial made, and when and where did it 

fail ? We have heard of some trials but of no failures. The slaves 
are used to work. The masters want their services. It would be 
strange if people who have been so long under such "kind guard- 
ians" snould not know enough to buy corn and cloth with their 
wages. Would the venders of these articles take advantage of their 
ignorance to cheat them ? How much more then would they do it 
if they had the whole bargain in their own hands, if, in other words. 
they " owned " them I What, strip a man, his heirs and assigns for- 
ever, of every thing under heaven, to save him from being cheated ? 
Most effectual prevention ! In the same way any disease may be 
prevented by cutting" a person's head off. 

Slavery is a strange way of taking care of people who are unable 
to take care of themselves. Why not have a legal inquiry into each 
individual case, and let the. judge appoint the guardians, where they 
are needed, and hold them to bail for their good management of the 
affairs of the ward, as is done in the case of whites who are non com- 
pos ? Surely some slaves ^can take care of themselves, for they do so 
the first opportunity they^get of running away. From self-appointed 
guardians, good Lord deliver the poor and the needy ! 

5. The slaves would not work if they were free. 



1838] 



Anti- Slavery Almanac. 



39 



Then they would get no pay. What right has any man to do any 
thing more than to refuse pay to another who refuses to work ? 

.But who knows that the slaves would refuse to work for wages, it 
they had a chance ? Wherever slaves have been freed they have 
•readily worked for wages. They did so in St. Domingo. They have 
done so in the British Colonies. Read what the Select Committee of 
the British Parliament, after long inquiry and hearing the evidence 
of all parties, have reported about the working of the apprenticeship. 
" In the evidence which they (the committee) have received, they 
find abundant proof of the general good conduct of the apprentices, 
and of their WILLINGNESS TO WORK FOR WAGES whenever 
they are fairly and considerately treated by their employers. It is, 
indeed, fully proved that the labor, thus voluntarily performed by the 
negro, is more effective than thai which was obtained from him in a state 
of slavery, or which is now given to his employer during the period 
for which he is compelled to work as an apprentice." In Antigua, 
where emancipation was immediate and entire, they work better 
than any where else. 

6. The slaves would cut their masters' throats if they were set free. 
Which most fear having their throats cut now, those who have 

freed their slaves or those who retain them? The planters of the 
British West Indies have lost their fear so much since the 1st of 
August 1834, that the European troops before considered necessary 
to guard them, are now chiefly withdrawn, and many of the richest 
colonies are guarded- almost entirely by negro troops ! Foes have 
been turned into friends by emancipation in the West Indies. "Why 
would not the same cause produce the same effect in the United 
States ? How many cases of throat-cutting can be traced to emanci- 
pation as the cause ? Not one. How many, to slave-holding ? 
Thousands, 

7. The two races could not live together in peace, on terms of equality. 
Do they live in peace on their present terms ? Chains, stripes. 

murders, and the pistols under the pillow of the planter, answer, NO. 
Theft, desertion and insurrections answer, NO. Slavery is a perpet- 
ual war of the strong upon the weak, of the rich upon the poor. 
Emancipation could not possibly make matters worse. 

But what do we mean by " terms of equality V Fair play. Letting 
every man have a fair chance. Terms of equality are the only terms 
on which there can be peace. 

8. The freedom of the blacks will lead to amalgamation. 

So will and does slavery. It is a strange way of preventing amal- 
gamation, to set up all the colored women to be sold at auction to 
the highest white bidders ! What, license unbridled amalgamation, 
bastard-wise, by slavery, and keep millions in slavery lest a white 
individual should choose to marry a black one ! — and that in a free 
country ! ! Shame, where is thy blush ? E. Wright, Jr. 



Liberty cannot live and flourish without the triumph of Abolition- 
ism, which teaches that ALL MEN have, by birth, a right to liberty. 
I if this sentiment should prevail, slavery will be abolished, of course. 
I But if it be not the public sentiment that ALL have a right to liberty,* 
I then NO security is left for the liberty of ANY MAN. 



40 



And- Slavery Almanac. 



[1838 



CONSPIRACY AGAINST NORTHERN FREEDOM. 

Working-men of the north ! if you are not resolved to keep your 
eyes closed in leaden slumber, and your ears fast stopped until the 
triple chains of slavery are- fastened around your limbs, AWAKE 
NOW, or it will be too late. 

I warn you against placing any confidence in your political lead- 
ers, of either party. There are very few among them who would 
not see you all made slaves if they could thereby acquire promotion. 
The " Republican members of the New-York Legislature " put forth 
an address last May, in which they say that they and their southern 
brethren are engaged in " the same holy cause of political liberty, >r 
and they try to discourage any discussion of the subject of slavery. 
Gov. Everett, a Whig governor of Massachusetts, recommended, in 
a carefully studied annual message, that we should, as an act of 
patriotism, refrain from a discussion of the inalienable rights of man. 
When this advice is complied with, the yeomanry of the north will 
be ready for the gag and the chain. 

The following extracts will show the nature of that political liberty, 
in whose " holy cause" northern politicians are so ready to unite 
with southern slave-holders. We will not now quote those newspaper 
paragraphs which have asserted that " the people at the north must 
HANG ABOLITIONISTS in order to preserve southern trade/'' or 
that " public opinion at the south would justify southern members of 
Congress in DRAGGING from their floor" an ex-president of the 
United States, or that any man who should presume to speak to the 
slave-holders on the immorality of slavery, " in. that same moment 
should have his tongue cut out and cast upon a dung-hill." Let these 
things go for fheiivvalue. We take official documents. 

The following is extracted from resolutions "agreed to by both 
houses of the Virginia Legislature, Feb. 10, 1836." 

Resolved, That the non-slaveholding States of the Union are re- 
spectfully but earnestly requested promptly to adopt PENAL EN- 
ACTMENTS or -such other measures as will EFFECTUALLY 
SUPPRESS ALL associations within their respective limits, pur- 
porting to be, or having the character of, abolition societies. 

The following is from resolutions " read three times and ratified 
in General Assembly" of North Carolina, Dec. 19, 1835. 

'Resolved, That our sisler states are respectfully requested to enact 
PENAL LAWS, prohibiting the PRINTING within their respective 
limits ALL such publications as MAY have a TENDENCY to 
make our slaves discontented. 

A compliance with this request would make 'it ILLEGAL to 
print the EIRLE. Nearly all newspapers would be suppressed. 
And even those- violent pro-slavery papers whose mottoes declare, 
•'•'The world is governed too much," or "I have sworn upon the altar 
of God, eternal hostility to EVERY FORM of TYRANNY over the 
mind of man," would not be spared. 

* The following is from resolutions "unanimously" adopted by both 
branches of the South Carolina Legislature, Dec. W, 1835. 

Resolved, That the Legislature of South Car'Ima, having every 
confidence in the justice and friendship of the non-Uaveholding States, 




Anti- Slavery Almanac. 



41 



ANNOUNCES her CONFIDENT EXPECTATION, and she ear- 
nestly requests, that the governments of these states will promptly 
andEFFECTUALLY SUPPRESS ALL those associations within 
their respective limits purporting to be abolition societies, &c. .&cc. 

From resolutions adopted "unanimously" by the Leg. of Georgia. 

Resolved, That it is deeply incumbent on the people of the north to 
CRUSH the traitorous designs of the abolitionists. 

From resolutions of Alabama Legislature, January 7, 1836. 

Resolved, That we call upon our sister states, and respectfully re- 
quest them to enact such PENAL LAWS as will finally PUT AN 
END to the' malignant deeds of the abolitionists. 

The spirit which dictated these resolutions will not rest satisfied 
until the all-grasping spirit of slavery has swallowed up all rights 
except the right claimed by the strong and the cunning to traffic in 
the bodies and souls of the weak and the ignorant. 

These insulting resolutions, however, should excite less indigna- 
tion than the base treachery of the northern office-holders, who, while 
they knew that such demands were put forth, instead of arousing the 
slumbering spirit of northern liberty, did their utmost to gag those 
faithful sentinels who were raising the alarm. 

la view of these demands, ponder well the following, from a faith- 
ful sentinel at the outer gate oi^ Freedom's temple. 



TO THE LABORING PEOPLE of the free states. 
Who are the laboring people of the north ? They are those who 
cat not the bread of, idleness, who "labor, working with their own 
hands," who practically illustrate the holy precept, " If any man will 
not work, neither shall he eat ; " — who " earn their daily bread by their 
.7." and (here/ore, according lo Mr. Senator Leigh, of Va., a are 
incapable of civil and political freedom ! " — The men who, according 
to Gov. M'Duffie of S. C, are "a dangerous element of the body 
politic,'? and must be enslaved within 25 years, whatever may be 
their color, " bleached or unbleached," in order to save the country 
from agrarian legislation and anarchy ! — in order to preserve 
<' the corner-stone of our republican edifice ! " 

Farmers ! working-men ! what do you think of this doctrine ? 
Must the hardy yeomanry of New England and the middle states be 
made slaves ? Is it true that a laboring people are incapable of free- 
dom ? Can none be free but idlers ? Are they the most virtuous ? — 
The most intelligent ? — The most orderly? — The most law-abiding? 
Let facts answer. Put you need no argument to convince you of 
the wickedness and folly of tiie assumption. 

Ail yet it is a doctrine that prevails, more or less, everywhere. 
Tt is t- i doctrine of slave-holders and their apologists. It is heard 
every day at the east and the north. It is the doctrine of all aristo- 
crats — all who look down with scorn upon the common people, and 
pride themselves upon their splendor, and wealth, und high standing 
above their neighbors. It is a doctrine that will be carried out into 
practice, before long, to its fullest extent, unless abolitionism gains 
the upper hand, and slavery is put down. This is not said without 
reflection. Look at some of the reasons for this belief. 

I. The slave-holders have determ ined to bring it to pass. I mean 



42 



Anti- Slavery Almanac. 



[1S38 



the most intelligent and influential among them. I-have already- 
quoted the language of two prominent southern statesmen. They are 
th* favorite statesmen of the slave-holders. And let it be remem- 
bered that there are slave-holders at the north I Our large cities 
abound with them. Not only so ; large plantations with their slaves 
are mortgaged to merchants and brokers in New York. These are 
the men that get up anti -abolition meetings and mobs to express 
public sentiment. Hence we see, • 

2. Not only the slave holders, but their apologists at the north, are 
bent upon the accomplishment of the same object. Is the proof de- 
manded ?-^-It is at hand ! Lock at the next item. 
' 3. They have actually put 'measures in train for the accomplish- 
, ment of their object. There is a perfect agreement and understand- 
ing between the northern and southern aristocrats on this subject. 
The southern demand is, that freedom of speech and of the press 
shall be put down at the north. Gov. M'Duihe judges those who 
maintain that all men have a right to liberty, to be worthy of •'•' death 
without benefit of clergy." To this sentiment the legislature of S. C. 
fully responds. Gov. Marcy, of N. Y., in his Message, says, " With- 
out the power to enact such laws" the States would not be able to 
maintain the relations of peace among themselves. Gov. Everett, 
of Massachusetts, suggested that the persons denounced by Gov. 
M'Dufiie were '''indictable at common law^ without any special 
enactment. A bill was actually introduced into the legislature of 
R. I. in conformity with the southern demands. Hon. "VVm. Sullivan 
and Rev. T. R. Sullivan, of Mass., wrote a pamphlet maintaining 
that " the village and country inhabitants " ought to be prevented by 
adequate pains and penalties from assembling to hear lectures against 
slavery. The Literary and Theological Review, conducted by Rev. 
Leonard Woods, Jr., patronized by many leading ministers in New 
England and the middle states, and commended by religious news- 
papers of extensive influence, has declared the leading abolitionists 
"justly liable to the highest civil penalties and ecclesiastical censurtsP 
Numerous northern ministers have endeavored to prove that the 
Bible does not forbid slavery, and that it is wrong to condemn the 
practice as sinful. 

These are a few of the measures simultaneously put in train, at 
the north and the south. It needs no argument to prove their object, 
and their adaptation to secure that object. The character of such 
measures is too plain to require comment. Men who will uphold 
and vindicate such measures show plainly that they would enslave 
their fellow-citizens if they could. They deny to them the most im- 
portant, inalienable and sacred rights of human beings, in the out- 
set. To suppose that they would not reduce human beings to slave- 
ry is to suppose that they would not act out their own avowed and 
openly professed principles — and principles, too, which they have 
acted out, as far as they have had the power. 

4. The manner in which southern demands have been met' by 
northern politicians proves conclusively that their Sympathies are 
strongly enlisted on the jade of the slave-holders. Instead of standing 
up manfully in behalf of insulted freedom, they have manifested a 
disposition to go as far as they dared in com pliance, with thos e a rro- 




gant and despotic demands. Witness the reply of Gov. Marcy to 
the demand for an innocent citizen of N. Y., the utter inaction of 
the legislature of Mass. when the SOVEREIGN AUTHORITIES 
of Georgia offered $5000 for a free citizen of Mass., — and the cring- 
ing, grovelling disposition manifested by the legislatures of most of 
the northern states. 

5. The effort is not yet relinquished ! With the exception, perhaps, 
of Mass., Vt. and R. I., no non-slaveholding state, at this moment, 
is free from impending danger of a gag-law! 

By the legislature of the state of N. Y. a report was adopted in 
May, 1836, responding to the sentiments of Gov. Marcy, and pledg- 
ing the faith of the state to enact such laws whenever they shall be 
required! This rep«.n was sent to the authorities of the south, but 
suppressed at the north ! The citizens of N. Y. in general were ig- 
norant of its contents till they saw it quoted, the winter following, in 
the Message of the acting governor of Virginia I The Farewell Ad- 
dress of Andrew Jackson — the Inaugural of Pres. Van Buren — the j 
Address of members of the legislature of N. Y., considered in con- J 
nection with the Message of the executive of Va. and the proceed- j 
ings of the legislature of Illinois, render it certain that the project of 
suppressing freedom of speech and of the press is by no means j 
relinquished. 

6. There is a still darker side of the picture. The measures of : 
the slave party have already begun to succeed! Freedom of debate in i 
Congress has been put down. A distinguished representative has j 
been threatened with assassination — with expulsion — with indict- 
ment by the grand jury of the slave-holding District ! And for what I 
crime? For advocating the abolition of slavery in the Federal Dis- j 
trict ? No! — For defending the right of freemen to petition! For 
this he is denounced as the " Massachusetts madman ! " An act oi 
madness to assert the right of petition in the free ! Yet the same 
Congress give us to understand that the FORFEITURE of the right 
of petition is the peculiar BADGE OF THE SLAVE! At the 
same instant, they virtually annul the right of petition in freemen ! 
The same Congress has refused to consider a petition in favor f the 
Declaration of Independence — a petition which made no mention oi 
slavery — on the ground that it was an anti-slavery petition ! 

The liberty of freemen cannot survive such a process. Liberty' 
is gone, if the people may not freely discuss, write, speak and peti- 
tion on any subject, and express whatever sentiments they please. 
How much more when human rights is the only subject interdicted ! ! 
— When sentiments of liberty are the only sentiments that are 
forbidden ! 

If color were ever a barrier between freedom and slavery, it is a 
barrier rapidly fading out of sight. There has been a contest be- I 
tween the interests of free and slave labor, in this country, for fifty 
years. They cannot live together much longer, and one or the 
other must triumph upon the ruins of its antagonist. The slave in- 
terest is making a desperate struggle. It demands Texas first, and 
then the Mexican states ! With such additional power, what will . 
become of the freedom of the north? Farmers! mechanics ! opera- j 
fives and laboring men ! consider these things. AVm. Gqopell-. 



44 



Anti-Slavery Almanac. 



[1838 



STORY OF ANTHONY GAYLE. 

In November 1836, 1 first heard of Mr. Ga3"le of New York,- who 
was recommended by those who knew him, as an excellent, trust- 
worth}'- man. I called on him, and wrote the following story as I 
received it from his lips, which, at my request he signed. It is here 
much abridged. Editor. 

I was born May i5, 1794, in Princess Ann County, Va. near Nor- 
folk. I had three brothers and three sisters, all older than myself. 
Before I was two years old, we were all removed to N. C. near Eden- 
ton, where my mother died about eight years after. WEile the earth 
was yet fresh on her grave, two of my brothers shared a fate more 
dreadful than that which had befallen her. ' ie slave-traders carried 
them away. Before I was seventeen, they finished the work of des- 
olation, and left me neither brother nor sister. At the age of thir- 
teen, I was sold to Mrs. Fanny Bullock, an aged lady, and she was 
a widow. I had lived with her about five years, when I sought com- 
forts amidst my cruel bereavements by marrying Nancy, who as well 
as myself was a Methodist and a slave. She was held as the proper- 
ty of Mrs. Hankins, who had one son and one daughter, who were 
heirs to the property which was claimed in my wife. The daughter 
was married to Thomas Hathaway, a preacher in regular connection 
with the church to which Mrs. Hankins, her son and daughter, my 
wife and myself were all attached. At the age of twenty, I hired 
my time for sixty dollars a year, and obtained permission to have 
my wife live with me in a house which I hired, on condition that I 
should support her and her children in sickness and health. These 
conditions I faithfully performed for fifteen years. I toiled early and 
late, for I, thought I was working for my wife and children. At the 
expiration of the above named term, Mr. Hathaway, my spiritual 
guide, requested permission TO SELL my wife, and the children 
vvhich God had given me. John Hankins, who was joint heir with \ 
his sister Hathaway, said he would have nothing to do with the 
transaction. By this, I suppose he meant that he would do nothing 
to p ivent it. The first man who came to buy, was a regular slave- 
trader from Georgia, but when he learned that I had brought up my 
five children which were then offered for sale, he refused to buy, un- 
less I could receive half the money. Mr. Hathaway would not con- 
sent to this. A purchaser soon appeared who was not so scrupulous. 
He was a Methodist from Lexington, Ky. who, as he journeyed, 
came to the place. He said his wife had requested him to buy a 
woman who had young children, if he could do it without distressing 
the husband ! ! ! He said he found my wife and children must be 
sokl, and he might as well buy them' as anyone else. A bargain 
was soon concluded between the clerical child-stealer and the profess- 
ing plunderer. I was again alone, and what added intensity to my 
suffering was the reflection, that he who had robbed me of my all, 
was my teacher in the religion of a merciful Saviour, the emblems 
of whose dying love I had often received from his hands. Though 
Mr. Hankins objected to the sale, I have no doubt he pocketed hall 
the proceeds. Anthony Gayle. 

Mr. Hathaway still retained his station, as a Methodist minister ! ! ! 



A BOY WHO LOVED LIBERTY 

A few years ago. 'a boy, about twelve years old!, came up from the 
shore of the Ohio river "to the house of a colored man who lived on 
its bank near Cincinnati. His feet were bloody, and his clothes 
were torn, but he seemed to keep up good spirits. He was born in 
Tennessee, and had been enslaved from his birth. Though he lived 
two hundred and fifty miles from the Ohio river, yet lie had heard of 
the free states beyond it. He was told that he would not be exactly 
safe when he got there, but he could not be held in slavery, as long 
as he was in a free state. 

lie thought of that untried freedom, and he determined, if possible, 
to gain it. He felt what slavery was, and he resolved to escape from 
it. At night, when the family were all still, he walked carefully 
away from the house. He went directly out of the highway, and 
travelled across the fields, proceeding cautiously along, as far from 
the houses as he could, for fear of being seen. 

As soon as he saw the morning light, he stopped, and kept himself 
concealed all day. At night he started again, and continued his 
course towards the North Star. In this way he went on, for more 
than forty nights. Sometimes he shrunk away from the driving 
storm ; and sometimes he trembled, as the bright moonbeams fell 
around him, lest he should be discovered. Part of the way lie tra- 
versed gloomy forests, where he heard the dismal hooting of the 
night-birds ; and, leaving these, he often found himself in the midst 
of dreary swamps, where loathsome reptiles were thick about him. 
His feet and legs were often scratched by the bricrs ; thorns and 
brambles through which he groped his way. 

All this he endured, arid his heart still cheered him on with the 
thought that he was escaping from that cruel bondage, the horrors 
o? which, young as he was, he had already learned. He had been 
told that he would not find a free state until he had crossed the broad 
river. At midnight, after six weeks of painful toil, he came to the 
water. He looked to the right and left till he was sure it was a 
liver, and it was much broader than any he had before seen. How 
djd his bosom swell as he surveyed the blue hills beyond it, and 
thought of the freedom which he might there enjoy ! His long and 
painful journey, and living on coarse and scanty food, had almost 
exhausted his strength. But the love of liberty urged him on, and 
he plunged into the water. He struggled hard to resist the down- 
ward current, and his little remaining strength had almost left him, 
when he gained the shore. He soon found kind friends, and was 
sent to school. "What must that slavery be which could induce 
so young a boy to encounter such dangers and endure such hard- 
ships ? 

What traitor knave could be found so base as to seize this bov, and 
return him to slavery ? ALL MAGISTRATES and sheriffs, and the 
whole community, are required by act of congress to be such trai- 
tors, when requested by the grasping man-stealer. Have we any 
thing to do with slavery ? 

By an act of Congress of Feb. 12, 1793, any one harboring this boy, 
[even his own mother,] after notice that he had fled from a slaveholder, 
is made liable to a penalty of $500, besides damages to the claimant. 



Ami- Slavery Almanac. 



[18381 



THE MOTHER SOLD.- 
Arise. my child, for see, the sun 

Shines on our parting day ; 
Rise from thy humble bed of moss, 

For I must hence away. ' 

couldst thou sleep the sleep of -death 
Ere thou wert left alone, 

Then I should know thou were at peace, 

And I could hardly mourn. 
Wo worth the day I gave thee birth, 

Since I must leave thee now, 
With shackles on thy tender limbs 

Aim brand upon thy brow. 
Through childhood, youth, and manhood's 

Thou 'It toil for others' gain ; [prime, 
And down the vale of age thou 'It drag 

The white man's 1 heavy chain. 
Yes, thou wilt wake when I am gone, 

And miss thy mother's tone, 
And thou wilt think that wilfully 

Site left thee thus alone. 
And thou wilt watch each coming day 

Willi childhood's anxious tear, 
To see. thy mother's glad return, 

When she cannot appear. 

1 cannot, will not leave thee so — 

Awake, my friendless one ! 



-By William Comstock. 

Child of a wretched mother, wake ! 

Awake, my orphan son ! 
And now he wakes and gently smiles— 

My blood runs cold the while— 
O why did God on fettered slaves , 

Bestow the power to smile ? 
These arms no more shall hold thee fast, 

This is our parting day, 
For cruel traders offer gold, 

And I must hence— away. 
Farewell, farewell, my weeping child,— 
I For, see, the white men come. 
I And, brandishing the cruel scourge, 

They call me from my home. 
They '11 rend thy arms from round my 

Our wreathed embrace divide ; [neck 
With curses loud and horrible 

They' 11 tear thee from my side ! 
Ah, God ! at thee they aim the blow, 

rVIy darling, and my joy ! 
On me, on me wear out your scourge, 

But, white men, spare my boy ! 
They 've borne him off, afar I go — 

I hear his bitter cry ; 
O Heaven, protect my friendless child, 

And let his mother die ! 



A FEARFUL CRISIS. ■ ■ 

It may be, that the suicidal act. against which we are -about to re- 
j monstrate in tones of horror, will have been committed, before our 
j appeal can be heard by the people of the non-slaveholding states 
J It may be, that, ere the introduction of the new year, tbedestiny of 
•! the nation will have been sealed beyond redemption. We are writ- 
| in g : this article in the month of June: in September, at the extra 
i session.rof Congress which has been summoned by the president of 
L'the United States, it is more than probable that the crowning act of 
relational perfidy and guilt will be consummated. " If so, then how 
i fearfully applicable will be the language of the prophet! — " This is 
' the land to be visited ; she is wholly oppression in the midst of her. 
As a fountain casteth out her waters, so she casteth out her wicked- 
ness : violence and spoil are heard in her; before me continually 
are grief and wounds. Be thou instructed, iest my soul depart from 
thee ; lest it make thee desolate, a land not inhabited. Your cove- 
nant 'with death shall be disannulled, and your agreement with hell 
shall not stand: when the overflowing scourge shall pass through, 
then ye shall be trodden down by it." 

The calamity which threatens us, is the annexation of Texas to 
the American Union. "as a slaveholding country, capable of being 
divided into six or eight Statts as large as Kentucky. 

The facts in this case, which ought to arrest universal attention, 
are briefly these : 

1. Un-til the year 1829, slavery existed in the Mexican empire, in 
a mitigated and crippled state — but was then totally and immediate- 
ly abolished throughout the republic by a decree of president. Guer- 
rero. Tn confoxmitv to an article in the Federal Constitution. This 



183S] Anti-Slavery Almanac. 47 

noble act of philanthropy ought to have excited the warmest admira- 
tion on the part of our own republic ; but, being herself wedded to 
slavery, she derived no satisfaction from an example which rebuked 
her in the presence of the nations. If it were scarcely to be expected I 
that she would hasten to imitate this example, surely it could not be 
reckoned among possible events, that she would seek to obtain a 
portion of the emancipated soil of Mexico, (by treachery, fraud, ne- 
gotiation, invasion and revolution, alternately,) for the purpose ot 
multiplying the victims of her cupidity, and re-establishing slavery 
and the slave trade, with all their bloody abominations! Yet such 
has proved to be the humiliating fact. 

2. As Ahab coveted Naboth's vineyard, so have the American 
slaveholders looked with an evil and envious eye upon the fertile 
soil of Texas, as a most "desirable acquisition. For several years 
past, they have been emigrating thither, carrying their slaves with 
them, and evading the decree of Mexico by indenting them as ap- 
prentices for 99 years ! A host of swindlers, horse-thieves, felons 
and murderers have followed in their train : — these have succeeded 
in revolutionizing the country, and now claim to be classed among 
the patriots of the American revolution ! Almost all their leaders 
are men known to be infamous for their crimes. 

3. During the last three years, enlistments of American soldiers to 
revolutionize Texas have been openly made in all parts of our coun- 
try, and ammunition of all kinds has been freely contributed, without 
remonstrance on the part of our national executive. tanding 
the solemn treaties which exist between Mexico and the 

4. Upon the result of a single battle won by American invaders, the 
Congress and Government of our country have recognised the inde- 
pendence of the republic of Texas — a republic numbering some 30 
or 40,000 inhabitants, (! ) and by the Constitution of which, Congress 
has no power to emancipate slaves, nor can any slaveholder give 
freedom to any slave without exiling him from the territory ; nor 
is any free person of African descent permitted to reside permanently 
in the republic without the consent of" Congress ; and the slave trade 
is made legal between the United States and Texas! 

fhe object of this unprincipled recognition is, to annex Texas to 





th made a part cf 
our Union — the nation involved in a war with Mexico, and probably j! 
with Great Britain — northern liberty of speech, of the press, and of j 
locomotion, yet more fearfully restricted— the victims of slavery j 
multiplied without number, until mischief shall come upon mischief, 
and rumor shall be upon rumor, and the land be full of bloody j 
crimes, and wrath be upon all the people ; until the eye of God shall j 
no longer spare, neither have pity — but he will recompense our ] 
ways upon us, and his fury go out like fire, and burn that none can I 
quench it, because of the evil of our doings. . j 

Let not this warninghe disregarded, if indeed it come not too late. j 
The South has not invaded and revolutionized Texas, at costly : 

\ rifices of treasure and blood, for nothing; the. Constitution of Texas if 
has not perpetuated slavery and the slave trade, for nothing : our gov- • 

j j eminent has not openly violated the faith of treaties, for nothing ; nor | 
have they hastily recognized the independence of Texas, for nothing, j 

ij Mexico has not given no the contest. If we receive Texas, we must 
i carry on the war, A WAR FOR CHAINS AND SLAVERY. But 
j the Texan- banditti are determined to procure their annexation.— 
! slaveholders have resolved that it shall be done, and they will succeed, 
unless northern freemen awake NOW. ' W. L. G.\p.r.isox. 



• A^TI-SLAVERY PUBLICATIONS, 
In great variety, in large or small quantities, may be obtained 

1. At the office of the American Anti-Slavery Society, 143 ; Nassau 
. New York. R. G. Williams, Publishing Agent. 

2. A. S. office. 25, Cornhiil, Boston. I. Krfepp, Publisher. 

3. Depository 131. Genesee st. Utica, N. Y. J. P. Bishop. 

4. Depository »78. Arcade, Providence. 11. I. Josiah. Cady. 

5. Depository 223, Arch st, Philadelphia, Pa. B. S. Jones. 

6. Philanthropist office, Cincinnati, Ohio. C, K. Bushnell. 

7. Herald of Freedom office, Concord, N. H. J. H. Kimball. 
PERIODICALS OF THE A. A. S. SOCIETY. 

1. Quarterly Magazine. 41(5 pp. per yr. E. Wright, Ed. Si in adv. 

2. Human Rights. Monthly. Single copy, 25'ets per annum. 20 
-copies to one address, $3,50. 40 do. So. SO do. 8 dollars.